Hospitalist Workforce in the US is on a Growing Spree

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

medicoreachLauren Williams
Marketing Manager and  Research Analyst
MedicoReach
TwitterHandle: https://twitter.com/Lauren7321 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the driving force behind the research and market study for estimating the hospitalist number in the US?

Response: The existing physician’s database available in the industry comprises details that don’t specify the number of hospitalists in particular. As a result, it is turning out challenging to track and count the hospitalists amidst other specialties. There are a lot of incorrect estimations that are circulating, giving no clear picture.

In a vast and growing industry like healthcare, there is no scope for wrong data as it can mislead others. Even the Physician Masterfile that the American Medical Association (AMA) offers do not cover the complete hospitalist population. This is because earlier the hospitalist specialty was not a part of the list of physicians.

Hospitalists work as primary care providers specializing in inpatient medicine. They play a significant role, coordinating with specialist physicians and other healthcare professionals. As a caregiver, they provide quality hospital care and boosts efficiency through effective hospital resource allocation. And so, how can we let their presence go overlooked? Our research aimed to bring out their actual numbers before the industry. That is why our research team came up with the research and market study to fetch real facts.  Continue reading

Better Coordination Needed Between Hospital Physicians and Home Health Care Providers

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Christine D. Jones, MD, MS, Assistant professor Director of Care Transitions, Hospital Medicine Group University of Colorado School of Medicine

Dr. Jones

Christine D. Jones, MD, MS
Assistant professor
Director of Care Transitions, Hospital Medicine Group
University of Colorado School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study is that referrals to home health care at hospital discharge have increased over recent years.  Yet, care coordination including information exchange and communication is often suboptimal between the hospital and home health care and may contribute to medication list discrepancies and even hospital readmissions.

We spoke with focus groups of home health nurses and our main findings were that improvements in key areas could care coordination after hospital discharge.

Specific solutions included:

1) Clearly defining the accountability for home health orders after discharge between hospitalists and primary care providers

2) Changes to insurance requirements that currently only allow physicians to write home health orders so that nurse practitioners and physician assistants can also write home health orders

3) Enhancing access for home health agencies to hospital electronic health records and direct phone lines

4) Encouraging liaisons from home health agencies to meet patients in the hospital to align clinician and patient expectations

5) Direct coordination between home health nurses and clinicians or pharmacists to resolve medication discrepancies

6) Ensuring that detailed information about cognitive and behavioral health is included in information provided to home health from referring hospitals

Continue reading

Value of a Hospitalists-Led, Post-Discharge Clinic

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:  Lauren Doctoroff, MD Hospitalist, Hospital Medicine Program Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Medical Director, HCA Post Discharge Clinic and PACT Transitional Care Program Instructor, Harvard Medical School Boston, MA 02215MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Lauren Doctoroff, MD

Hospitalist, Hospital Medicine Program
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Medical Director, HCA Post Discharge Clinic and PACT Transitional Care Program
Instructor, Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA 02215

MedicalResearch.com What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Doctoroff: A dedicated post discharge clinic, staffed by hospitalists, led to a shorter interval to a clinic visit for patients after discharge.  Patients with resident primary care doctors and those who are African American were most likely to use the clinic.  The care provided in the clinic, in terms of testing, was consistent with the remainder of the practice. Continue reading