Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Genetic Research, Weight Research / 24.01.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_47128" align="alignleft" width="200"]Brian R. Lane MD PhD Division of Urology Spectrum Health Grand Rapids, Michigan Dr. Lane[/caption] Brian R. Lane MD PhD Division of Urology Spectrum Health Grand Rapids, Michigan MedicalResearch.com: Can you explain how you conducted your study, and what the main findings were? Response:  We used large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify genetic variants associated with obesity measures, blood pressure, lipids, type 2 diabetes, insulin, and glucose. these genetic variants were used as proxies for the above-mentioned risk factors and evaluated in relation to renal cell carcinoma risk (kidney cancer) using GWAS data from 10,000 RCC patients and 20,000 control participants. -          Based on these genetic data, we found that multiple measures of obesity, as well as diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and fasting insulin, are associated with renal cell carcinoma risk. In contrast, we found little evidence for an association with RCC risk for systolic blood pressure (SBP), circulating lipids, overall diabetes, or fasting glucose. 
Author Interviews, Cancer / 15.10.2014

Cathryn Bock, PhD Associate Professor, Oncology Department Karmanos Cancer Institute Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI 48201MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Cathryn Bock, PhD Associate Professor, Oncology Department Karmanos Cancer Institute Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI 48201 Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Bock: This study examined the association between dietary antioxidant micronutrients and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) among a cohort of 96,196 postmenopausal women from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). During follow-up (median follow-up time was 12 years), there were 240 cases of confirmed renal cell carcinoma in the cohort. Dietary lycopene intake, measured at  baseline, was associated with a decreased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Women with the highest quartile of lycopene intake (>6427.7 mcg/day) had approximately 40% lower risk of RCC compared to those women in the lowest quartile of lycopene intake (<2727.6 mcg/day). There were no statistically significant associations observed between intake of beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein + xeazanthin, vitamin C, or vitamin E and renal cell carcinoma.