Author Interviews, BMJ, Pain Research, Rheumatology / 22.03.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: “tai chi 11.4.09” by Luigi Scorcia is licensed under CC BY 2.0Chenchen Wang MD, MSc Professor of Medicine Tufts University School of Medicine Director, Center For Complementary And Integrative Medicine Division of Rheumatology Tufts Medical Center Boston, MA 02111  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Patients with chronic widespread pain often try many different types of pain medications, anti-depressants, physical therapy, and other approaches, and commonly find that none of these therapies work for them. Finding safe, effective approaches for pain management is an urgent priority. Previous evidence suggested that Tai Chi, a multi-dimensional mind-body practice that integrates physical, psychosocial, and behavioral elements, may be especially suited to address both chronic pain and associated psychological and somatic symptoms. In our most recent study published in the BMJ, we directly compared the effectiveness of Tai Chi versus aerobic exercise, which is a standard care non-drug treatment for fibromyalgia.
Author Interviews, Heart Disease / 15.03.2015

Ricardo Stein, MD, ScD Exercise Cardiology Research Group, Cardiology Division Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, BrazilMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ricardo Stein, MD, ScD Exercise Cardiology Research Group, Cardiology Division Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Dr. Stein: Patients with a recent myocardial infarction (MI) present a reduction in functional capacity expressed as a decrease in peak oxygen consumption (VO2 peak). The impact of a Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) cardiac rehabilitation program for patients recovering from recent MI has yet to be assessed. Our goal was to evaluate functional capacity after a TCC-based cardiac rehabilitation program in patients with recent non complicated MI. MedicalResearch: What are the main findings? Dr. Stein:  After the 12-week study period, participants in the Tai Chi Chuan group experienced a significant 14% increase in VOpeak from baseline (21.6 ± 5.2 to 24.6 ± 5.2 mL.Kg-1.min-1), whereas control participants had a non-significant 5% decline in VOpeak (20.4 ± 5.1 to 19.4 ± 4.4 mL.Kg-1.min-1). There was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.0001). As a primary outcome, CPET results for the TCC and control groups at baseline and after the 12-week intervention period leading to a significant difference in peak VO2 (5.2 mL.Kg-1.min-1; 95% CI, 2.8 to 7.7, in favor to TCC group). This difference remained significant after adjustment to baseline measurements, age, gender, diabetes, and smoking (4.1 mL.Kg-1.min-1; 95% CI, 2.6 to 5.6, in favor to TCC group). Summarizing: -       We observed a significant increase in VO2 peak in TCC group participants. -       Our results provide important information data from a randomized clinical trial of Tai Chi Chuan in patients with a history of recent MI. -       Tai Chi Chuan can be an attractive alternative to cardiac rehabilitation for patients who don't have access to conventional cardiac rehabilitation programs.