Children with Birth and Chromosomal Defects More Likely to Develop Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Philip J. Lupo, PhD, MPH Co-Director, Childhood Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Program, Texas Children's Cancer Center Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics Section of Hematology-Oncology, Member, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center Baylor College of Medicine Adjunct Associate Professor, Human Genetics Center, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences University of Texas School of Public Health

Dr. Lupo

Philip J. Lupo, PhD, MPH
Co-Director, Childhood Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Program, Texas Children’s Cancer Center
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics
Section of Hematology-Oncology,
Member, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center
Baylor College of Medicine
Adjunct Associate Professor, Human Genetics Center, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences
University of Texas School of Public Health
 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?  

Response: While cancer risk in children with certain chromosomal defects like Down syndrome is well established, much less is known for children with birth defects where there is no known genetic cause, sometimes called non-chromosomal defects. Non-chromosomal defects, as a group, affect more children, but one of the primary challenges of understanding risk among these children is that limited sample sizes make studying specific defects, like spina bifida, more difficult.

Because of that, we gathered data from birth, birth defect, and cancer registries across Texas, Arkansas, Michigan, and North Carolina to generate a birth cohort of more than 10 million children born between 1992 and 2013. We looked at diagnoses of cancer until 18 years of age to determine differences in cancer risk between those with and without birth defects.

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