Author Interviews, Orthopedics, Technology / 02.02.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_47270" align="alignleft" width="160"]Professor Sherry Towfighian PhD Mechanical Engineering Binghamton University   Prof. Towfighian[/caption] Professor Sherry Towfighian PhD Mechanical Engineering Binghamton University   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?  Response: We wanted to avoid using batteries in a load monitor that can be placed in total knee replacement. We looked into energy scavenging technologies and studied the most appropriate one for this application. Energy scavenging is converting wasted energy such as walking to electricity for low power sensors. Our research study showed walking can provide enough electrical energy (about 6 microwatts) for low power load sensors. These load sensors are important in providing information about the mechanical load throughout different activities. It can be used in the future to create a self -awareness device for the patient to avoid certain activities. 
Author Interviews, Technology / 21.11.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_29851" align="alignleft" width="300"]YuHao Liu (Howard) Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign Tiny Skin Sensor Can Monitor Body Sounds[/caption] YuHao Liu (Howard) Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois Urbana Champaign MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Our research group has been working on developing the next-generation wearable technology - integrating electronic tattoos on human skin for healthcare monitoring. This novel platform allows us to explore new sensors and actuators that are better than the commercially available ones. We have developed sensors that can measure temperature, pressure, hydration, electrophysiology..etc. However, no one ever think about capturing sound from the body until our team developed this new technology. In fact, body sounds can be important indicator in healthcare monitoring or even disease diagnostic.