Accidents & Violence, Author Interviews, JAMA / 25.02.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_47576" align="alignleft" width="100"]Hannah Decker Hannah Decker[/caption] Hannah Decker MD Candidate, Class of 2019 Emory School of Medicine [caption id="attachment_47661" align="alignleft" width="142"]Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS FACEPPhysician-in-chief for emergency medicine at Lifespan and Chair of the department of Emergency Medicine Brown Dr. Jeremiah Schuur[/caption] Jeremiah Schuur, MD, MHS FACEP Physician-in-chief for emergency medicine at Lifespan and Chair of the department of Emergency Medicine Brown MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?  Response: Firearm injury is a leading cause of injury and death in the United States. Many physician groups advocate for evidence-based policies, such as universal background checks, to reduce this morbidity and mortality. We studied contributions of the 25 largest political action committees (PACs) affiliated with physician professional groups during the 2016 election cycle and found that almost all gave more money to political candidates who voted against universal background checks and were endorsed by the NRA. These PACs contributed to more than twice as many incumbent US Senate candidates who voted against an amendment to expand firearm background checks than those who voted for the amendment. In the US House of Representatives, the pattern of giving was similar. These PACs gave $2.8 million more to candidates who did not sponsor a bill to expand background checks than to those who did. Finally, these physician PACs were more than twice as likely to contribute to and gave almost $1.5 million dollars more to candidates rated A by the NRA.