Manuka Honey May Reduce Harmful Biofilm Formation in Catheters

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Bashir A. Lwaleed PhD, FRCPath, PGCAP, FHEA, CBiol FSB, FIBMS Faculty of Health Sciences University of Southampton South Academic and Pathology Block (MP 11) Southampton General Hospital Southampton UK

Dr. Bashir Lwaleed

Dr. Bashir A. Lwaleed PhD, FRCPath, PGCAP, FHEA, CBiol FSB, FIBMS
Faculty of Health Sciences
University of Southampton
South Academic and Pathology Block (MP 11)
Southampton General Hospital
Southampton UK

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The study merges two longstanding interests. We have long worked out of several departments at Southampton and Portsmouth on the therapeutic potential for natural products (including the medium – chain fatty acids GLA (evening primrose oil) and EPA (fish oil) as well as honeys from a number of floral sources. Secondly, there is an established research theme in the Faculty of Healthcare Science at Southampton addressing continence related issues; moreover catheter management as an economic and infection control issue is a major concern in the NHS Trust Urology department. Biofilms on catheters are sources of infection, honey has proven antibacterial (and other therapeutic) properties in topical applications such as skin ulceration. It is a logical step to assess whether a similar use may be made for honey instilled into the bladder and/or flushing the lumen of a catheter.

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Standardized Model Empowers Nurses To Decrease Urinary Catheter Use

Jerome A. Leis, MD MSc FRCPC Staff physician, General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases Physician Lead, Antimicrobial Stewardship Team Staff member, Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Dr. Jerome Leis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Jerome A. Leis, MD MSc FRCPC

Staff physician, General Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases
Physician Lead, Antimicrobial Stewardship Team
Staff member, Centre for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Leis: Overuse of urinary catheters leads to significant morbidity among hospitalized patients.  In most hospitals, discontinuation of urinary catheters relies on individual providers remembering to re-assess whether patients have an ongoing reason for a urinary catheter.  We engaged all of the attending physicians to agree on the appropriate reasons for leaving a urinary catheter in place and developed a medical directive for nurses to remove all urinary catheters lacking these indications.  This nurse-led intervention resulted in a significant reduction in urinary catheter use and catheter-associated urinary tract infections, compared with wards that continued to rely on usual practice.

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Antibiotic Impregnated Catheters Can Reduce Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection

Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS Assistant Professor Trauma, Acute, and Critical Care Surgery Washington University in St. LouisMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Stephanie Bonne, MD, FACS
Assistant Professor
Trauma, Acute, and Critical Care Surgery
Washington University in St. Louis

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We had previously implemented education programs in our ICU in an attempt to decrease our Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) rate.  We were, however, unable to come to zero.  We were looking for innovative ways to lower our CLABSI rate, and the use of Clorhexidine/Silver Sulfadiazine catheters was unable to move our CLABSI rate.  We decided to try Minocycline/Rifampin catheters, and monitor our Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: The use of Minocycline/Rifampin impregnated catheters can lower Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate, particularly in ICUs who have been unable to reach a Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection rate of zero with other measures.

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Central Venous Catheters Raise Infection Risk in Cancer Patients

Allison Lipitz-Snyderman, PhD Assistant Attending Outcomes Research Scientist Center for Health Policy and Outcomes Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY  10065MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Allison Lipitz-Snyderman, PhD
Assistant Attending Outcomes Research Scientist
Center for Health Policy and Outcomes
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY  10065

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lipitz-Snyderman: Long-term central venous catheters are used to administer intravenous fluids and treatments such as chemotherapy.  These catheters can also be a source of bloodstream infections which can be harmful to cancer patients.  However, this risk is not well understood.  In our study, we found that the use of these catheters was associated with an increased risk of infections for patients with cancer.  We used a population-based dataset, SEER-Medicare, to study this issue in older adult cancer patients.  This dataset allowed us to study patients treated in different institutions and follow them over time.
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