Bone Growth Stops Earlier in Today’s Children

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dana L. Duren, PhD Professor, Director of Orthopaedic Research Director of Skeletal Morphology Laboratory Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, University of Missouri Columbia, MO 6521

Dr. Duren

Dana L. Duren, PhD
Professor, Director of Orthopaedic Research
Director of Skeletal Morphology Laboratory
Thompson Laboratory for Regenerative Orthopaedics
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 6521

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The motivation for this study is the apparent accelerated maturity in children in the United States.

Radiogram of distal tibia (left) and fibula (right) showing two epiphyseal plates. Wikipedia Image

Radiogram of distal tibia (left) and fibula (right) showing two epiphyseal plates.
Wikipedia Image

 

We previously demonstrated that skeletal maturity (bone age) is more advanced in today’s children compared to children born in the first half of the 20thCentury (Duren et al., 2015).

n the current study (Boeyer et al., 2018) we show that a significant component of this advanced maturity status is the timing of epiphyseal fusion. In our study, nearly half of the epiphyses of the hand and wrist began or completed fusion significantly earlier in children born after 1995 than those born in the early part of the century, with differences as great as six to ten months for some bones, and mean differences on the order of 4 months in boys and 6 months in girls.  Continue reading