Physician MOC Status Linked To Better Diabetes Performance Measure

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bradley Gray, PhD
Senior Health Services Researcher
American Board of Internal Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: This study is part of an ongoing effort to improve and validate ABIM’s MOC process through the use of real data that is ongoing here at ABIM.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings? 

Response: The paper examines the association between MOC status and a set of HEDIS process quality measures for internists twenty years past the time they initially certified. An example of one HEDIS performance measure we looked at was percentage of patients with diabetes that had twice annual HbA1c testing. The key findings of the paper are that physicians who maintained their certification had better scores on 5 of 6 HEDIS performance measures than similar physicians who did not maintain their certification.

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Performance Improvement CME Improved Psoriasis Care By Dermatologists

Robert S. Kirsner, MD, PhD, FAAD Interim Chairman and Harvey Blank Professor in Dermatology, Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Director, University of Miami Hospital Wound Center Chief of Dermatology, University of Miami HospitalMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Robert S. Kirsner, MD, PhD, FAAD

Interim Chairman and Harvey Blank Professor in Dermatology, Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Director, University of Miami Hospital Wound Center
Chief of Dermatology, University of Miami Hospital

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Kirsner: Psoriasis is common, affecting 7.5 million Americans. The major indication of psoriasis is chronic inflammation of the skin. It is characterized by disfiguring, scaling and erythematous plaques that may be painful or pruritic and may cause significant quality of life issues. Psoriasis may also cause joint pain and more recently has been associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, hypertension and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, patients may be physically and emotionally impacted by psoriasis.

The American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) developed a Performance Improvement (PI) CME activity to enhance dermatologists’ care of psoriasis patients by allowing them to evaluate their practice using patient charts, utilize evidence-based strategies to overcome self-identified gaps, and then re-measure their performance using charts for patients seen after practice changes were implemented.

It was found that the PI CME activity significantly improved dermatologists’ overall documentation of patient history, patient counseling for lifestyle behaviors and shared decision-making ability. For example, dermatologists who participated in and completed this PI CME activity improved practice performance by either inquiring about or documenting to a greater extent comorbidities (particularly cardiovascular disease), drug costs and interactions, patient preference, other medical problems, and severity of disease, resulting in an overall improvement in documented clinical behaviors.

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