Tracing Extrachromosomal DNA Inheritance Patterns in Glioblastoma Using CRISPR

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eunhee Yi, Ph.D.Postdoctoral AssociateThe Jackson Laboratory

Dr. Yi

Eunhee Yi, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Associate
The Jackson Laboratory

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Recurrence after therapy for glioblastoma (GBM) is unavoidable. There are substantial differences among the cells of GBM tumors in the abundance and types of genetic materials. This heterogeneity is a major driver of therapy failure and disease progression. We previously reported that extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) elements, which reside outside the linear genome and represent a mechanism to amplify and activate oncogenes, is a potential cause of the increasing genetic diversity in GBM. Our current study is focused on the development of a novel cytogenetic tool to visualize ecDNA to visualize the behavior of these elements in live cells. We have leveraged the unique properties of ecDNA to develop a CRISPR-based “ecDNA tracing toolbox (EDTB)”.  Continue reading

CRISPR Gene Editing May Lead To Cure For Retinitis Pigmentosa

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kang Zhang, M.D., Ph.D.</strong> Professor of Ophthalmology Chief, Ophthalmic Genetics Founding Director, Institute for Genomic Medicine Co-Director, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute for Engineering in Medicine Board Certification in Ophthalmology Fellowship in Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center Guangzhou Medical University Guangzhou China

Dr. Kang Zhang

Kang Zhang, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Ophthalmology
Chief, Ophthalmic Genetics
Founding Director, Institute for Genomic Medicine
Co-Director, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Institute for Engineering in Medicine
Board Certification in Ophthalmology
Fellowship in Vitreoretinal Disease and Surgery
Guangzhou Women and Children’s Medical Center
Guangzhou Medical University
Guangzhou China
MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Retinitis pigmentosa is a common blinding condition characterized by mutations in rod photoreceptor specific genes, night blindness and tunnel visual with eventual loss of day vision. Since it can be caused by numerous different mutations in many genes therefore it has been difficult to provide treatment benefits to a majority of patients. Traditional gene therapy has been in a piece-meal fashion, meaning to create a therapy for a particular gene or mutation. In this paper, we describe a universal gene therapy approach using the latest gene editing technology CRISPR/CAS9 to reprogram rod photoreceptors to cone photoreceptors with reversal of RP and restoration of vision.

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