Author Interviews, Colon Cancer, Genetic Research, JAMA / 03.04.2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_40952" align="alignleft" width="200"]Heather Hampel, MS, LGC Associate Director, Division of Human Genetics Associate Director, Biospecimen Research Professor, Internal Medicine Licensed Genetic Counselor The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbus, OH  43221 Heather Hampel[/caption] Heather Hampel, MS, LGC Associate Director, Division of Human Genetics Associate Director, Biospecimen Research Professor, Internal Medicine Licensed Genetic Counselor The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbus, OH  4322 MedicalResearch.com:  What is the background for this study?  What are the main findings? Response: The background is that we had recently shown that some colorectal cancer patients who underwent traditional screening for Lynch syndrome were eventually found to have double somatic (two acquired) mutations in the MMR genes and they did not have Lynch syndrome at all. This was discovered after their tumor had already had MSI and/or IHC screening test, followed by MLH1 methylation and/or BRAF testing, followed by germline DNA testing on a blood sample from the patient for MMR gene mutations, then finally by sequencing their tumor. This gave us the idea to reverse the sequence and start with tumor sequencing since it might streamline testing, save time, and prevent several other tests. In addition, we knew that all stage IV colorectal cancer are already supposed to have tumor sequencing of the KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF genes and MSI testing for treatment purposes. Our hypothesis was that an upfront tumor sequencing test could replace all these separate tests with similar sensitivity and specificity.
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Colon Cancer, Genetic Research / 17.12.2016

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_30499" align="alignleft" width="125"]Heather Hampel, MS, LGC Associate Director, Division of Human Genetics Associate Director, Biospecimen Research Professor, Internal Medicine Licensed Genetic Counselor The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbus, OH 43221 Heather Hampel[/caption] Heather Hampel, MS, LGC Associate Director, Division of Human Genetics Associate Director, Biospecimen Research Professor, Internal Medicine Licensed Genetic Counselor The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center Columbus, OH 43221 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: This study was part of the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative, a statewide study being conducted at 50 hospitals that includes universal tumor screening for Lynch syndrome. For the subset of 450 colorectal cancer patients diagnosed under age 50, we performed multi-gene cancer panel testing regardless of the results of their tumor screening for Lynch syndrome since early age of diagnosis is a red flag that a cancer might be hereditary.
Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Genetic Research, JAMA / 08.07.2015

Aung Ko Win, MBBS MPH PhD Research Fellow NHMRC Early Career Clinical Research Fellow Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Melbourne School of Population and Global Health The University of Melbourne VIC 3010 AustraliaMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Aung Ko Win, MBBS MPH PhD Research Fellow NHMRC Early Career Clinical Research Fellow Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Melbourne School of Population and Global Health The University of Melbourne VIC 3010 Australia Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: About 2-5% of uterine cancer are associated with an underlying genetic condition mainly Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. At least 1 in 1000 people in the population have a mutation that causes Lynch syndrome and these people have a very high risk of cancers mainly bowel and uterine cancers. One in three women with a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes are likely to develop a uterine cancer in their lifetime. The only way to reduce the risk of uterine cancer for these women is to remove the uterus. There is no current recommendation for screening method to detect uterine cancer early. Almost nothing is known about if and how lifestyle factors and hormonal factors can modify their risk of uterine cancer. By studying 1128 women with a mutation that causes Lynch syndrome who were recruited from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA, we found that later age at first menstrual cycle, having one or more live births, and using hormonal contraceptive use for one year or longer were associated with a lower risk of uterine cancer.