Recreational Cannabis Linked to Acute Pancreatitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Tarek Alansari, MD Metropolitan HospitalTarek Alansari, MD
Metropolitan Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Cannabis is the most frequently consumed recreational drug in the world. The use of cannabis is becoming increasingly accepted by the general public in the United States. The estimates of the prevalence of cannabis use in the United States is about 9.5% in the adult population and the prevalence of dependence or abuse approaches 2.9%. Those under the age of 35 years are the most frequent consumers. According to Business Insider as of June 2018, recreational cannabis is legal in 9 states and medical cannabis is legal in 30 states. Recent surveys show that about 35 million Americans are frequent cannabis users.

Aiming for symptomatic relief, some patients with different gastrointestinal disorders have turned to cannabis without fully understanding the effect of its use for their individual condition.
Biliary tract disease, ethanol abuse, infections, autoimmunity, and genetics are well known causes of acute pancreatitis. However, medication-induced pancreatitis remains a less common etiology. In about 20% of cases of acute pancreatitis despite of the great improvement in genetic testing and imaging modalities, the workup still fails to reveal an etiology. These cases are labeled idiopathic.

Cannabis use is emerging as a rare, possibly overlooked cause of acute pancreatitis with few cases reported in the literature. In the United States, only 5 cases of cannabis – induced acute pancreatitis (AP) have been reported till September 2017. The review of literature revealed that only 26 cases of cannabis-induced AP have been reported worldwide. Continue reading

Hypertriglyceridemia Markedly Increases Risk of Acute Pancreatitis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Borge G. Nordestgaard, MD, DMSc

Professor, University of Copenhagen
Chief Physician, Dept. Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital
Copenhagen University Hospital
Herlev, Denmark

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas with gallstones and high-alcohol consumption as leading risk factors, while mild-to-moderately increased plasma triglycerides hitherto has been overlooked. We surprisingly found that the risk of developing acute pancreatitis was increased already from triglycerides of 175 mg/dL (2 mmol/L) and above. When triglycerides were above 443mg/dL (5mmol/L) the risk was increased a massive 9-fold. Interestingly, this risk was higher than the corresponding 3.4-fold higher risk for myocardial infarction.

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