Author Interviews, Surgical Research / 29.07.2020

Rhinoplasty is a common plastic surgery procedure for people who want to alter the look of their nose. There are several versions of the procedure, including one that augments the nose by adding an implant. nose-plastic-surgery Some surgeons prefer to use human cartilage from the septum, ears, or ribs. But, other surgeons prefer to use synthetic implants made of either Gore-Tex or silicone. Before you get a nose job from the best rhinoplasty surgeons, it is important to know which material is best for you. Before you choose Gore-Tex or silicone, you should take time to talk to your surgeon and work together to pick the material that will give you the look you want. An augmentation rhinoplasty takes about 90 minutes, but the change to your face will last a lifetime.
  1. What is a silicone implant?
The silicone implant is easy to insert and easy to shape. It can also be removed if there are any problems. Surgeons like them as they offer a more noticeable lift to the bridge of the nose. Silicone implants need very small incisions, if they are done from the outside.
  1. What is a Gore-Tex implant?
Gore-Tex is porous, so it gives a less noticeable lift to the bridge as it merges with the tissues in the nose. Surgeons like to use Gore-Tex because it provides a natural look. Because Gore-Tex integrates with nasal tissue, it is more difficult to remove than a silicone implant. (more…)
Author Interviews, JAMA, Surgical Research / 30.11.2014

Hong Ryul Jin, MD Professor and Chair Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, KoreaMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Hong Ryul Jin, MD Professor and Chair Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Although autologous rib cartilage is a useful graft material for rhinoplasty, surgeons sometimes encounter unpleasant complication such as warping or donor-site morbidity. These complications are not infrequent, but there has been no systematic review with regarding this matter. For evidence-based practice, we aimed to assess the long-term safety of using rib cartilage by means of meta-analysis. By reviewing the 10 selected, eligible articles after extensive screening, we found that rates of warping, resorption, infection, and displacement were 3.1, 0.2, 0.6, and 0.4%, respectively. Hypertrophic scar at chest was found in 5.5%, with highest report of 23.8%. Warping and hypertrophic chest scarring showed relatively higher rates, warranting a surgeon’s attention (more…)