NSAIDS May Increase Mortality From Endometrial Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Theodore Brasky, PhD Research Assistant Professor Center of Excellence in Regulatory Tobacco Science Epidemiology College of Public Health The Ohio State University

Dr. Theodore Brasky

Theodore Brasky, PhD
The Ohio State University
Comprehensive Cancer Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There is a significant amount of data to suggest that long-term, regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS; examples include aspirin and ibuprofen) are associated with reduced risks of several cancers. Although the data across studies are inconsistent, one such candidate is endometrial cancer, which is the most common gynecologic cancer. There is good evidence that the use of these medications is associated with improved prognosis among patients diagnosed with colon cancer. Despite the importance of inflammation in endometrial cancer progression, very few have examined whether use of NSAIDs is associated with risk of death or recurrence from the disease. The study we published is the first of its kind to examine NSAID use comprehensively and in a study of over 4,000 patients.

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Hormonal and Reproductive Factors Influence Uterine Cancer Risk in Lynch Syndrome

Aung Ko Win, MBBS MPH PhD Research Fellow NHMRC Early Career Clinical Research Fellow Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics Melbourne School of Population and Global Health The University of Melbourne VIC 3010 AustraliaMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Aung Ko Win, MBBS MPH PhD

Research Fellow
NHMRC Early Career Clinical Research Fellow
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health
The University of Melbourne VIC 3010
Australia

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: About 2-5% of uterine cancer are associated with an underlying genetic condition mainly Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes. At least 1 in 1000 people in the population have a mutation that causes Lynch syndrome and these people have a very high risk of cancers mainly bowel and uterine cancers. One in three women with a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes are likely to develop a uterine cancer in their lifetime. The only way to reduce the risk of uterine cancer for these women is to remove the uterus. There is no current recommendation for screening method to detect uterine cancer early. Almost nothing is known about if and how lifestyle factors and hormonal factors can modify their risk of uterine cancer.

By studying 1128 women with a mutation that causes Lynch syndrome who were recruited from Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA, we found that later age at first menstrual cycle, having one or more live births, and using hormonal contraceptive use for one year or longer were associated with a lower risk of uterine cancer.

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Bariatric Surgery May Reduce Risk of Uterine Cancer

Dr. Kristy Ward Department of Reproductive Medicine UCSD School of MedicineMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Kristy Ward
Department of Reproductive Medicine
UCSD School of Medicine

 

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of this study?

Dr. Ward: As the second leading cause of preventable death, obesity is one of the nation’s most serious public health problems.  Over two-thirds of the US population is currently overweight or obese and the prevalence continues to increase.  A number of studies have linked obesity with an overall elevated risk of cancer and with many individual cancer types. Among obesity related cancers in women, endometrial cancer is most strongly associated with increasing body mass, with 39% of cases in the US attributable to obesity.

In patients with clinically severe obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2), bariatric surgery results in rapid weight loss and has greater long-term success when compared to non-surgical weight loss methods. Surgical weight loss procedures have been found to reduce obesity-related comorbidites and improve outcomes in clinically severe obese populations. In addition to improved cardiovascular risk factors and mitigation of physical symptoms, there is increasing evidence that cancer risk is reduced after bariatric surgery.
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