Recurrent Diabetic Ketoacidosis Signals High Mortality Risk

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Fraser W Gibb MBChB PhD FRCP Edin Consultant Physician / Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer Edinburgh Centre for Endocrinology & DiabetesDr Fraser W Gibb MBChB PhD FRCP Edin
Consultant Physician / Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer
Edinburgh Centre for Endocrinology & Diabetes

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: We know that diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with a low risk of death in those admitted to hospital but we did not know what the risk of death was in the months and years following discharge from hospital.

We have found that recurrent DKA admissions (more than 5 in a lifetime) are associated with a greater than 1 in 5 risk of death in the following three years compared to a 1 in 20 risk for those with only a single DKA. Recurrent DKA is more common in younger, more socially disadvantaged people.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: That recurrent DKA should be a ‘red flag’ for high mortality risk.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We need to confirm these findings in large national data series but also begin to develop an evidence-based strategy to support this vulnerable patient group and help reduce this unacceptably high risk of death.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
 Gibb FW, et al “Risk of death following admission to a U.K. hospital with diabetic ketoacidosis” Diabetologia 2016; DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-4034-0.

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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