Diagnostic Value of Cerebrospinal Fluid Neurofilament Light Protein in Neurologic Diseases

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Charlotte E. Teunissen,

Prof. Teunissen

Charlotte E. Teunissen, PhD
Neurochemistry Laboratory, Department of Clinical Chemistry
VU University Medical Centre, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam
Amsterdam, the Netherlands

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Several reports have shown increased in NfL in various neurological disorders, separately. We wanted to know how the levels are in these disorders relative to each other. Moreover, some reports showed absence of age effects in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients, which is normally present in controls. So, we thought that it would be good to study age effects in a large group of controls, and if these effects are absent in other diseases, similarly as in MS.

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SVC As Marker of Respiratory Decline in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jinsy Andrews, MD, MS Director of Neuromuscular Clinical Trials Columbia University The Neurological Institute New York, NY 10032 

Dr. Andrews

Jinsy Andrews, MD, MS
Director of Neuromuscular Clinical Trials
Columbia University
The Neurological Institute
New York, NY 10032 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The importance of respiratory function in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) has long been recognized. Despite ALS being a clinical diagnosis with variable presentation and variable rates of disease progression, all patients experience respiratory symptoms and inevitably die typically from respiratory failure. At present there is no validated biomarker of disease progression or clinical staging system. Direct measure of respiratory function in ALS is important and can be measured using vital capacity. Although the forced maneuver (FVC) has been widely used in patients with ALS, it can underestimate the actual lung capacity by causing fatigue or inducing bronchospasm in patients with ALS. More recently, the slow maneuver (SVC) has been used since it can be obtained from patients with advancing disease which can potentially minimize missing data and may reduce any underestimation of actual lung capacity due to a forceful effort. However, the prognostic value of the decline in SVC is unclear in patients with ALS.

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