AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Blood Pressure - Hypertension, NYU, Race/Ethnic Diversity / 16.09.2020

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Aisha T. Langford, PhD, MPH Assistant Professor Department of Population Health Co-Director, CTSI Recruitment and Retention Core NYU Grossman School of Medicine NYU Langone Health New York, NY 10016 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: In 2018, the American Heart Association (AHA) published an updated Scientific Statement on Resistant Hypertension. The term apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is used when pseudoresistance (e.g., white coat effect, medication nonadherence) cannot be excluded. The current study was designed to investigate if Black adults with aTRH, a group disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease, receive evidence-based approaches to lower blood pressure as recommended in the 2018 AHA Scientific Statement. Specifically, we studied healthy lifestyle factors including not smoking, not consuming alcohol, ≥75 minutes of vigorous-intensity or ≥150 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity per week, and body mass index <25 kg/m2; and recommended antihypertensive medication classes among US Black adults. (more…)
Author Interviews, Blood Pressure - Hypertension, Compliance / 15.05.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Gupta Pankaj Consultant Metabolic Physician/Chemical Pathologist Dr. Patel Prashanth - Consultant Metabolic Physician/Chemical Pathologist Department of Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, UK   MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Non-adherence or patients not taking their medications as prescribed is known since the time of Hippocrates. It is the key reason why blood pressure is well controlled in only around 50% of patients with hypertension, despite the availability of good medicines. Non-adherence leads to poorer cardiovascular outcomes and is thought to cost $100 billion to the US health economy. A crucial reason for the lack of progress in improving adherence has been the previous lack of a clinically useful objective measure. We and others have developed a robust and reliable biochemical screening method to assess for non- adherence to antihypertensive medications in urine or blood using a technique called liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.  We have previously reported a single centre study that demonstrated high rates of non-adherence in patients attending a hypertension clinic. Since, then we have set up a National Centre for Adherence Testing (NCAT, ncat@uhl-tr.nhs.uk) in the Department of Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL) and receive samples from around 25 hypertension clinics across UK. This study analysed data from~1400 patients consisting of samples received in UHL and also from a cohort of patients in the Czech Republic. (more…)
AHA Journals, Author Interviews, Compliance, Duke, Heart Disease / 06.06.2015

Robin Mathews, MD Duke Clinical Research Institute Duke University Medical Center Durham, NCMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robin Mathews, MD Duke Clinical Research Institute Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Mathews: Though treatment for patients with an acute myocardial infarction with evidence based therapies has increased significantly over the years, adherence to these therapies after discharge remain sub optimal. We used a validated instrument, the Morisky scale, to assess patient medication adherence.  We found that in a contemporary population of 7,425 patients across 216 hospitals, about 30% of patients were not adherent to prescribed cardiovascular medications as early as 6 weeks after discharge. Patients with low adherence were more likely to report financial hardship as well as have signs of depression. In addition, we found that patients who had follow up arranged prior to discharge and those that received explanations from the provider on the specific medications, were more often adherent to therapies. There was a non significant increase in risk of death or readmission at 2 months (HR [95% CI]: 1.35 [0.98-1.87]) among low adherence patients. (more…)