FDgard® Demonstrated Rapid Relief of Symptoms in Functional Dyspepsia

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

William D. Chey, M.D., F.A.C.G.</strong> Director, Division of Gastroenterology Michigan Medicine Gastroenterology Clinic Ann Arbor, Michigan

Dr. Chey

William D. Chey, M.D., F.A.C.G.
Director, Division of Gastroenterology
Michigan Medicine Gastroenterology Clinic
Ann Arbor, Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Functional Dyspepsia (FD), which is persistent or recurring upper abdominal pain, burning, or fullness with no known organic cause, is a relatively common and often frustrating condition. The precise causes of this condition are unknown, but problems with mild inflammation, leakiness of the lining of the gut, overactive sensation, and abnormal contractions of the upper digestive tract are thought to play a role in many patients. FD often reoccurs over time and it is an area of high unmet medical need.

Functional Dyspepsia can have a significant impact on quality of life. Currently, off-label medications are used to treat FD, as there is no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmaceutical product for the condition.

An estimated 62 percent of FD patients suffer from Epigastric Pain Syndrome (EPS, which is epigastric pain or burning), while an estimated 73 percent of FD patients suffer from Postprandial Distress Syndrome (PDS, which is early fullness, pressure and heaviness); 35 percent suffer from both.

In this study, we compared the efficacy of a unique encapsulated formulation of caraway oil and l-Menthol, the primary component in peppermint oil), (COLM-SST) to placebo in patients taking their usual Functional Dyspepsia medications. Caraway oil contains carvone and d-limonene, which have gastroprotective and prokinetic effects; l-Menthol has anti-inflammatory, prokinetic, analgesic and gastroprotective effects.

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Novel Peppermint Oil Formulation Designed To Control Irritable Bowel Symptoms

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brooks D. Cash, MD</strong> Chief, Gastroenterology Division Professor of Medicine University of South Alabama Mobile, AL 36688

Dr. Cash

Brooks D. Cash, MD
Chief, Gastroenterology Division
Professor of Medicine
University of South Alabama
Mobile, AL 36688

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional disorder characterized by multiple symptoms including, but not limited to, abdominal pain or discomfort, constipation, diarrhea, urgency of bowel movement (BM), a sensation of incomplete evacuation, pain at evacuation, abdominal bloating, and passage of gas or mucus. IBS can be classified into four primary subtypes: mixed IBS (IBS-M), diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D), constipation-predominant IBS (IBS-C), and unsubtyped IBS (IBS-U). Among adult patients with IBS, a sizeable proportion suffers from IBS-M, with prevalence rates among IBS patients estimated to be between 44% to 66%. Because of the variability in symptoms associated with IBS-M and the lack of effective or approved therapies, clinicians often face challenges in managing this common IBS subtype.

PO and its active ingredient, l-Menthol, are kappa opioid agonists, possess smooth muscle calcium channel antagonist and serotonergic (5HT3) antagonist properties, and exert anti-inflammatory, anti-infective, and carminative effect. A recent meta-analysis of medical therapies for IBS found that PO had the lowest number needed to treat among the various options evaluated. The previously published IBS Reduction Evaluation and Safety Trial (IBSREST) showed that PO-SST, a novel formulation of PO using solid-state microspheres to target delivery to the small intestine, was an effective IBS therapy at 24 hours, with improved efficacy at 4 weeks in a combined group of IBS-M and IBS-D patients. In view of the unmet need in IBS-M, we performed a post hoc analysis of the effects of PO-SST among only the IBS-M patients from the IBSREST trial.

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New Drug May Protect Gut From Antibiotic-Resistance Genes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

Sheila Connelly, PhD
Vice President, Research
Synthetic Biologics, Inc.

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Synthetic Biologics, Inc. is focused on the protection and preservation of the gut microbiome which is the diverse collection of microorganisms that live in the intestinal tract. We are learning that the gut microbiome plays a key role in health. Negative changes to the microbiome, called dysbiosis, are linked to disease states including allergies, autism, and obesity, among a rapidly growing list of other conditions. A consequence of using antibiotics is that, in addition to fighting the bacterial infection being treated, they also kill the gut microbiota. The space left in the gut by the dead bacteria allows other surviving bacteria, many times opportunistic pathogens or microbes that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, to overgrow and fill the open niches. Exposure to antibiotics, particularly broad-spectrum antimicrobials, such as penicillins and cephalosporins, is a major risk factor for acquiring a potentially deadly Clostridium difficile infection.

Dr-Sheila-Connelly.jpg

Dr. Sheila Connelly

Another consequence of antibiotic use is the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Widespread use of antibiotics provides selective pressure for the evolution of lethal, multi-drug resistant pathogens, termed “nightmare bacteria”. The gut microbiome acts as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance that can be triggered, by antibiotic exposure, to acquire and propagate resistance genes.

A way to protect the microbiome and reduce antibiotic resistance is to limit exposure of the gut microbiota to antibiotics. To this end, we developed an antibiotic inactivation strategy using a beta-lactamase enzyme to degrade beta-lactam antibiotics in the GI tract before they can harm the gut microbiome. Beta-lactamases are naturally-occurring bacterial enzymes that confer resistance to beta-lactams, the most widely used broad spectrum antibiotics, and their presence is normally considered an obstacle to efficacious infection control. We took advantage of the highly efficient antibiotic degradation activity of a beta-lactamase and developed SYN-004 (ribaxamase). Ribaxamase is a beta-lactamase engineered to inactivate penicillins and most cephalosporins, formulated for oral delivery, and intended for use with IV beta-lactam antibiotics to degrade the antibiotics in the GI tract to protect the microbiome.

Ribaxamase was demonstrated to significantly reduce the occurrence of C. difficile disease in a recently completed Phase 2b clinical study. The study met its primary endpoint by demonstrating that ribaxamase, when delivered orally with IV ceftriaxone, significantly reduced C. difficile disease in patients treated for a respiratory tract infection. Ribaxamase also resulted in a significant reduction in new colonization by vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE).

For the current study, pig models of antibiotic-mediated gut dysbiosis were established using three classes of beta-lactam antibiotics, a cephalosporin, ceftriaxone, a penicillin, amoxicillin, and a carbapenem, ertapenem. The ceftriaxone model was used to evaluate the protective effect of ribaxamase on the microbiome and the amoxicillin and ertapenem models are intended for evaluation of pipeline products.

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