Strong Evidence HPV Vaccination Highly Effective Outside Trial Settings

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Marc Brisson Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Modeling and Health Economics of Infectious Disease Associate Professor, Université LavalMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Marc Brisson

Canada Research Chair in Mathematical Modeling and Health Economics of Infectious Disease
Associate Professor, Université Laval

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Since 2007, 52 countries have implemented human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) programmes. Two HPV vaccines are currently available worldwide: the bivalent vaccine, which targets HPV types 16 and 18, causing 70-80% of cervical cancer, and the quadrivalent vaccine, which also targets HPV types 6 and 11, associated with 85-95% of anogenital wart cases. Large international randomised controlled clinical trials have shown both vaccines to be safe, well tolerated and highly efficacious against vaccine-type persistent infections and precancerous cervical lesions.  Furthermore, both vaccines have shown some level of cross-protection against 3 HPV types (HPV 31, 33 and 45) not included in the vaccine and associated with a supplementary 10-15% of cervical cancers worldwide. Now that 7 years have elapsed since the implementation of the first HPV vaccination program, we verified whether the promising results from clinical trials are materialising at the population level. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the population-level impact in countries that have introduced HPV vaccination programs.

In countries with high female vaccination coverage (<50%), our main findings indicate:

  • sharp declines in HPV-related outcomes among females targeted for vaccination (e.g., HPV-16/18 infection and anogenital warts declined by more than 60% in females younger than 20 years), and
  • evidence of cross-protection with significant reductions in HPV-31/33/45 infection among females younger than 20 years
  • evidence of herd effects (indirect benefit of vaccination among unvaccinated individuals) with significant reductions in anogenital warts among males and older females.

In countries with low coverage (<50%), we report:

  • significant reductions in HPV-16/18 infection and anogenital warts among young females, with no indication of herd effects or cross-protection. Continue reading

New Ninevalent HPV Vaccine Gives Greater Protection Against Cervical Cancer and Genital Warts

Elmar A. Joura, M.D Gynecologist University of ViennaMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Elmar A. Joura, M.D
Gynecologist
University of Vienna

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of this study?

Dr. Joura: This study demonstrates that the new ninevalent HPV vaccine induces a good immunogenicity against HPV 6/11/16/18 and gives a 97% protection against disease caused by HPV 31/33/45/52/58. This has a potential of a 90% reduction of cervical cancer and other HPV related cancers and a similar protection against genital warts. The full benefit is seen in persons without current HPV infection, this reinforces early vaccination against HPV. The safety profile was favourable.
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