No Evidence to Support the “Hispanic Paradox” of Cardiovascular Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Fatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH, FACC Assistant Professor Cardiovascular Medicine Stanford University School of Medicine

Dr. Rodriguez

Fatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH, FACC
Assistant Professor
Cardiovascular Medicine
Stanford University School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: The “Hispanic Paradox” is an idea based on some epidemiological observations that Hispanics have lower disease prevalence and mortality (across a wide spectrum of disease states), despite adverse risk profiles and lower socioeconomic status than their non-Hispanic white counterparts.

Our study is unique in that it includes a Hispanic population with overall high educational attainment followed longitudinally. In contrast to prior work in this area, we found no evidence in support of the Hispanic paradox for estimated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk, atherosclerotic disease (as measured by CAC), or overall mortality.

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Breast Cancer Mortality Varies By Latina Subgroups

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Bijon Hunt Epidemiologist photographed for Sinai Health System on Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Photo credit: Randy Belice

Bijon Hunt

Bijou R. Hunt,  MA
Sinai Urban Health Institute, Sinai Health System
Chicago, IL 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Hispanic women, as well as the leading cause of cancer death for this group. Research has shown that there are differences by Hispanic subgroup in various causes of death, including cancer, but we haven’t seen data on breast cancer specifically among Hispanic subgroups. The most important question we wanted to address with this study was: do breast cancer prevalence and mortality vary by Hispanic subgroup?

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