USPSTF: More Research Needed to Determine What Primary Care Providers Can Do to Detect and Treat Lead Poisoning

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alex H. Krist, MD, MPHVice-Chairperson, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Professor of family medicine and population healt Virginia Commonwealth University

Dr. Krist

Alex H. Krist, MD, MPH
Vice-Chairperson, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force
Professor of family medicine and population healt
Virginia Commonwealth University

 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Exposure to lead can have serious lifelong effects on the health and wellbeing of children. There is no safe level of lead exposure, so finding and removing any source of lead exposure is essential.

In its review of the evidence, the Task Force found that more research is needed to determine what primary care clinicians can do to help prevent and treat the health problems that can result from lead exposure in childhood and pregnancy.

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Pediatric Blood Lead Levels in Public vs Private New York Housing

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lead paint can crack and form flakes, which can contaminate the surrounding environment. Source: Wikipedia

Lead paint can crack and form flakes, which can contaminate the surrounding environment.
Source: Wikipedia

Ms. Jacqueline Chiofalo, MPA
Director of Policy Research & Analysis
The Institute for Family Health
Astoria, New York 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Exposure to lead is dangerous and has been banned from use in residential dwellings. However, residual sources of lead still exist. Few studies have examined pediatric lead poisoning between public (NYCHA) and private housing units, and no recent studies performed in New York City. Our study used retrospective chart analysis of routine child lead testing to examine the difference in blood lead levels between the two housing types.

Our data showed that children seen in our health centers who lived in New York City public housing had significantly lower mean blood lead levels and fewer children were found with levels over the CDC reference range of 5 μg/dL compared to children who lived in private housing.  Continue reading