Extremely Low Gestational Age Neonates May Benefit From Delayed Cord Clamping

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Abhay K Lodha Department of PediatricsAlberta Health Services 

Dr. Lodha

Abhay K Lodha MD, DM, MSc
Department of Pediatrics
Alberta Health Services  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: There is no physiological rationale for clamping the umbilical cord immediately after birth. In moderate (32+0 weeks-33+6 weeks) and late preterm infants (34+0 to 36+6), delayed cord clamping reduces the need for blood transfusions, leads to circulatory stability and improves blood pressure.

However, the information on the association of delayed cord clamping with outcomes for extremely low gestational age neonates (22-28 weeks of gestation) is limited.

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Even Extremely Preterm Infants Have a Chance of Survival

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Edward Bell, MDVice Chair for Faculty DevelopmentDepartment of PediatricsProfessor of Pediatrics - NeonatologyCarver College of MedicineUniversity of Iowa Health Care

Dr. Bell

Edward Bell, MD
Vice Chair for Faculty Development
Department of Pediatrics
Professor of Pediatrics – Neonatology
Carver College of Medicine
University of Iowa Health Care 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The study is an analysis of what happened to the 205 babies with birth weigh below 400 grams and gestational age of 22 through 26 weeks who were born between 2008 and 2016 at 21 academic medical centers that are members of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network. The Network exists to collaborate in finding ways to improve the survival and health of premature and other critically-ill newborn infants. 400 grams is very small. By comparison, 1 pound is 454 grams.

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