More Complications When Pacemaker Required After TAVR

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Harindra C. Wijeysundera MD PhD FRCPC FCCS FAHA Director of Research, Division of Cardiology, Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI) Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine & Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto Adjunct Senior Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)

Dr. Wijeysundera

Harindra C. Wijeysundera MD PhD FRCPC FCCS FAHA
Director of Research, Division of Cardiology,
Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
Senior Scientist, Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI)
Associate Professor, Dept. of Medicine & Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto
Adjunct Senior Scientist, Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)
Toronto, ON, Canada

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: One of the most common complications post TAVR is the need for a permanent pacemaker.  It is unclear if the need for a pacemaker is associated with long term adverse outcomes.

Using a population level registry of all TAVR procedures in ontario, canada, we found that pacemakers were required in ~15% of cases.  Requiring a pacemaker was associated with worse long term outcomes, including death, readmission to hospital and emergency room visits.  Continue reading

Increased Ectopic Heart Beats Linked to Less Effective Pacing with CRT Therapy

Martin Huth Ruwald, MD, PhD Post doctoral research fellow Heart Research Follow-up Program University of Rochester Medical Center Rochester, NY, USMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Martin Huth Ruwald, MD, PhD
Post doctoral research fellow
Heart Research Follow-up Program
University of Rochester Medical Center
Rochester, NY, US

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Ruwald: A high percentage of biventricular pacing is required for optimal outcome in patients treated with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), but the influence of ectopic beats on the success of biventricular pacing has not been well established.

We found that patients with increasing amount of ectopic beats (the ectopic burden) (≥0.1%) were more likely to achieve low biventricular pacing <97% and had higher risk of heart failure or death and ventricular arrhythmias. Similarly the study identified patients with a very low amount of ectopic beats, less than 1 in 1000, who are very likely to obtain high biventricular pacing and who have very low risk of adverse outcomes.
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