Author Interviews, CDC, Infections, JAMA, Pediatrics / 15.01.2019

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Srinivas Acharya Nanduri, MBBS, MD, MPH Respiratory Diseases Branch, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Roybal Campus Atlanta, GA 3033 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of serious illness such as meningitis and sepsis in infants. Among infants, there are two main types of GBS disease. Early-onset GBS disease occurs during the first week of life and late-onset GBS disease occurs from the first week through three months of life. Rates of early-onset disease in the United States have decreased significantly since the 1990s through widespread implementation of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) guidelines. However, IAP does not prevent late-onset disease. Maternal immunization represents a nonantibiotic strategy to prevent both early and late-onset disease. Multivalent polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines are under development against GBS capsular types, with candidate vaccines in phase I and II trials. Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) conducts active surveillance for early and late-onset GBS disease among infants in select counties of 10 states, covering about 10% of live births across the United States. We analyzed data from early and late-onset GBS cases identified from ABCs between 2006 and 2015 to describe their epidemiology, incidence trends, and associated strain characteristics. (more…)
Annals Internal Medicine, Author Interviews, Infections / 17.02.2015

Robert M Centor, MD, MACP Chair ACP Board of Regents Regional Dean, UAB Huntsville Regional Medical Campus Huntsville, AL 35801 Professor, General Internal Medicine UAB Birmingham, AL 35294-3407 MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Robert M Centor, MD, MACP Chair ACP Board of Regents Regional Dean, UAB Huntsville Regional Medical Campus Huntsville, AL 35801 Professor, General Internal Medicine UAB Birmingham, AL 35294-3407 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Centor: European researchers have shown that Fusobacterium necrophorum, an obligate gram-negative anaerobe, likely causes approximately 10% of young adult pharyngitis. This same organism is the major cause of peritonsillar abscess in the age group (and this age group has the highest rate of peritonsillar abscess). The organism also causes around 80% of the Lemierre Syndrome. We knew of no US data evaluating the role of this bacteria as a cause of pharyngitis. The European studies also did not report the signs and symptoms of Fusobacterium pharyngitis. (more…)