Substance Abuse and Tobacco Linked To Longer Term Opioid Use

W. Michael Hooten, M.D Professor of Anesthesiology Mayo ClinicMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
W. Michael Hooten, M.D

Professor of Anesthesiology
Mayo Clinic

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Hooten: The purpose of the study was to investigate a gap in knowledge related to the progression of short-term opioid use to longer-term use.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?

Dr. Hooten: The main findings are that a history of substance abuse or tobacco use is associated with the progression from short-term to a longer-term pattern of opioid prescribing.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Hooten: Physicians and patients should be aware that a history of substance abuse and smoking may be risk factors for longer patterns of opioid use.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Hooten: In future research, we plan to focus on the potential effects that the initial opioid dose may have on longer-term patterns of opioid use.

Citation:

Incidence and Risk Factors for Progression From Short-term to Episodic or Long-term Opioid Prescribing: A Population-Based Study.

Hooten WM, St Sauver JL, McGree ME, Jacobson DJ, Warner DO.

Mayo Clin Proc. 2015 Jul;90(7):850-6. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2015.04.012.

W. Michael Hooten, M.D, & Professor of Anesthesiology (2015). Substance Abuse and Tobacco Linked To Longer Term Opioid Use 

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