Study: Oral Probiotic Supplement Significantly Increased Circulating Vitamin D Levels

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Mitchell Jones, MD, PhD Faculty of Medicine at McGill University in MontrealDr. Mitchell Jones, MD, PhD
Faculty of Medicine at McGill University in Montreal

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Jones: We had previously reported on the cholesterol lowering efficacy of bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 due to reduced intestinal sterol absorption.

However, the effects of bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 on fat soluble vitamins was previously unknown and was the focus of the study.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected?

Dr. Jones: The study provides evidence that oral supplementation with BSH-active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 does not reduce the absorption of fat soluble vitamins and unexpectedly increases the circulating levels of 25(OH)D.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Dr. Jones: In the context of hypercholesterolemia and low-normal levels of 25(OH)D, the observed increases in mean circulating 25(OH)D may be physiologically relevant in this population, as there is good evidence that improved 25(OH)D status is associated with improved metabolic status and that low levels are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events.

Oral supplementation with L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 should be considered for improving vitamin D status in this group.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Dr. Jones: This effect should be confirmed in future clinical studies examining at-risk subjects.

Further research is warranted regarding the mechanism of action and whether dysbiosis may result in changes in vitamin D status.

Citation:

Jones, M. Modulation of the microbiome with L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 reduces cholesterol, inflammatory markers and increases 25(OH) vitamin D. Poster session presented at: Probiotics, Prebiotics, and the Host Microbiome: The Science of Translation. 2013 June 12; New York, NY.

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