Young Childhood Cancer Survivors: Deficits in Physical Function

Kirsten Ness, PT, PhD 
 Epidemiology and Cancer Control MS 735, Room S-6013 St. Jude Children's Research Hospital 262 Danny Thomas Place Memphis, TN 38105-3678MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Kirsten Ness, PT, PhD
Epidemiology and Cancer Control
MS 735, Room S-6013
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
262 Danny Thomas Place
Memphis, TN 38105-3678

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? 

Answer: Even though they report similar levels of physical activity, children who were treated for cancer and who survive at least five years, on average, do not perform as well as their siblings on tests of physical performance.  They have muscle weakness and decreased cardiopulmonary fitness.

MedicalResearch.com: Were any of the findings unexpected? 

Answer: Yes – we expected that for similar levels of physical activity, survivors would perform like their siblings.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? 

Answer: Simply participating in physical activity may not be specific enough to overcome cancer or treatment related muscle weakness and fitness limitations among children who survivor their original cancer diagnosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study? 

Answer: Childhood cancer survivors may not respond to exercise or physical activity like other children.

A proof of principle study to evaluate response to prescribed exercise in this population is warranted.

Citation:

Deficits in physical function among young childhood cancer survivors.

Hoffman MC, Mulrooney DA, Steinberger J, Lee J, Baker KS, Ness KK.

PT, Mail Stop 735, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105
J Clin Oncol. 2013 Aug 1;31(22):2799-805. doi: 10.1200/JCO.2012.47.8081.
Epub 2013 Jun 24.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.