Federal Government Contributions to Public Health and the Environment over the Past 220 Years: 1798-2018

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Gilbert Rochon, III PH.D., MPH Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Global Health Management & Policy Tulane University’s School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine Senior Consultant with MSF Global Solutions, LLC New Orleans

Dr. Rochon

Dr. Gilbert Rochon, III PH.D., MPH
Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Global Health Management & Policy
Tulane University’s School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine
Senior Consultant with MSF Global Solutions, LLC
New Orleans

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Having observed the frequency with which President Donald Trump characterized changes in regulatory policies and funding levels with respect to public health and the environment as eliminating or curtailing “unnecesssary Obama-era regulations,” I became curious as to the full extent and impact of such deregulation and under-funding of health and environmental safeguards.

In the process, I found it necessary to review federal government contributions to public health and the environment under all previous presidents.  Continue reading

Why Don’t Younger Men Get Health Check Ups?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
"Blood pressure check" by Army Medicine is licensed under CC BY 2.0Pallavi Bhandarkar MPH
Nova Southeastern University
Kirkland, Washington

preetipshenoy@gmail.com 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Gender based preventative health has been of interest to medical community since 1900’s with health disparities between males and females being of particular interest. United States founded National Research Institutes for female health in 1900. This led to comprehensive and systematic medical services being offered which have improved female health care significantly. Similar research programs and initiatives to improve men’s health were started only in 2000 (1).

Cultural depiction of men being fearless and based on perception of masculinity leads them to underutilize the preventative health care screenings available to them or sometimes even delay care when they need it the most. Males have been found to have higher mortality rates compared to females.

Life expectancy for females was 5.0 years higher than for males. The difference in life expectancy between the sexes has narrowed since 1979, when it was 7.8 years, but it increased 0.2 year in 2016 from 2015, the first increase since 1990. Death rates for males increased significantly for age groups 15–24, 25–34, 35–44, and 55–64. Rates decreased significantly for age groups 75–84 and 85 and over” (2)

My research study adopted the basic survey design and conducted an anonymous survey throughout United States with men aged 18 to 40 being the participants.

Our goal was to identify these gaps, analyze the reasons for underutilization and identify opportunities to improve preventative care guidelines among the male population. The main findings were almost similar to the BFRSS data obtained by CDC in the year 2016. Continue reading