Link Between Night Shift Work and Miscarriage

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Luise Mølenberg BegtrupInstitute of Public HealthUniversity of Southern Denmark | SDU

Luise Mølenberg Begtrup

Luise Mølenberg Begtrup
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: There are indications that working fixed night shifts is associated with a higher risk of miscarriage.

Since many women work rotating shifts including night shifts, we were interested in examining the association between the amount of night work and miscarriage. We were able to do this by use of detailed exposure data based on payroll data.

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Migraine Linked To Increased Risk of Stroke, AFib, PE and Cardiovascular Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Headache.” by Avenue G is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Kasper Adelborg, MD, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Clinical Epidemiology
Aarhus University Hospital 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Around one billion people worldwide are affected by migraine. Migraine has considerable impact on quality of life and imposes a substantial burden on society. Migraine is primarily a headache disorder, but previous studies have suggested a link between migraine and stroke and myocardial infarction, particularly among women, while the link between migraine and other heart problems are less well known.

In this large register-based Danish study published in the BMJ, we confirmed that migraine is associated with increased risks of stroke and myocardial infarction, but we also found that migraine was associated with increased risks of other cardiovascular diseases (specifically, venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation). Migraine was not associated with increased risks of heart failure or peripheral artery disease.

In contrast to most previous studies, our study had a very large sample size and an age- and sex- matched comparison cohort from the general population, which allowed us to put migraine in a population context and to perform several subgroup analyses. Here, we found several interesting findings.

  • In general, the associations were strongest in the first year after diagnosis but persisted in the long term (up to 19 years after diagnosis).
  • Most associations applied to both migraine patients with aura (warning signs before a migraine, such as seeing flashing lights) and in those without aura, and in both women and in men. 

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