Frequent Fried Food Consumption Linked To Increased Heart Failure

Luc Djousse, MD, ScD, FAHA Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Editor-in-Chief, Current Nutrition Reports Director of Research, Division of Aging Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston, MA 02120MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Luc Djousse, MD, ScD, FAHA

Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Editor-in-Chief, Current Nutrition Reports
Director of Research, Division of Aging
Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA 02120

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Djousse: While some studies have reported a higher risk of coronary heart disease, diabetes, or high blood pressure with frequent consumption of fried foods, other investigators did not confirm those results. To date, only few studies have evaluated whether frequent consumption of fried foods can raise the risk of developing heart failure. Frying foods not only increases the energy density of foods, but also increase the amount of trans fats. Trans fats can lead to development of heart disease and diabetes and consumption of energy-dense foods in large quantity can lead to weight gain and resulting cardiovascular consequences.

We followed about 15000 US male physicians who were free of heart failure for an average of 10 years and found that frequent consumption of fried foods was related to a higher risk of developing heart failure. For example, people that consumed fried foods daily or more were twice more likely to develop heart failure than individuals who consumed fried foods less than once per week.
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Fried Food Consumption and Obesity Linked to Genetic Predisposition

Prof. Lu Qi, Assistant Professor, Department of Nutrition Harvard School of Public Health and Channing Division of Network Medicine Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MAMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Prof. Lu Qi,
Assistant Professor, Department of Nutrition
Harvard School of Public Health and Channing Division of Network Medicine
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Lu Qi: In this study, we for the first time provide reproducible evidence from three large cohort studies to show that the association between regular consumption of fried foods and higher BMI was particularly pronounced among people with a greater genetic predisposition to obesity. On the other hand, the adverse genetic effects on BMI were also amplified by consuming more fried foods, the effects among those who ate fried foods more than four times a week was about twice as large compared with those who ate them less than once a week.

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