More Protein Associated With Moderate Increase in Heart Failure in Men (except for fish and eggs)

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“mmmm Meat” by Glen MacLarty is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Jyrki Virtanen, PhD
Adjunct professor of nutritional epidemiology
Heli Virtanen, MSc

University of Eastern Finland
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition
Kuopio, Finland 


MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Previous studies have found that animal sources of protein may have an adverse impact on the risk of cardiovascular diseases, like myocardial infarct, whereas plant sources of protein have had an opposite impact.

In this study we investigated that how protein intake from different dietary sources is associated with developing heart failure in men during the study’s follow-up. During the mean follow-up time of about 22 years, 334 men developed heart failure.

The main finding of the study was that higher protein intake was associated with a moderately higher risk of heart failure and the findings were similar with protein from most dietary sources, although the association was stronger with protein from animal sources. Only protein from fish and eggs were not associated with the risk in our study. Continue reading

Calorie Restriction Extends Life Through Protein Regulation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

John C. Price, Ph.D Asst. Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry Brigham Young University Provo, Utah

Dr. John Price

John C. Price, Ph.D
Asst. Professor Chemistry and Biochemistry
Brigham Young University
Provo, Utah

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Since 1930 it has been known that the rate of biological aging could be modified by the diet.  In mice for example if you let them eat as much as they want they will live almost 3 years.  Providing essentially the same diet but controlling the number of total calories, there is an almost linear increase in lifespan as you restrict calories.  The studies in mice and rats have been repeated hundreds of times since that time.  There have been a lot of somewhat conflictive observations, like increased formation of new mitochondria, and increased autophagy which targets organelles for degradation, during stable reduced calorie intake. This expectation, that a restricted diet with fewer calories available to the animal could support increased protein synthesis and degradation and result in increased lifespan, is what got us interested in studying Calorie Restriction.  So we measured the relative synthesis rates for several hundred proteins in 18 month old calorie restricted mice which were experiencing the benefits of improved health and lifespan.  We found overwhelmingly that the calorie restricted mice had reduced synthesis rates down to as low as 25% of the age matched control group.  This observation has now been independently confirmed by multiple groups.

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Vegetarian Protein Sufficient For Appetite Control and Weight Loss

dr alex johnstoneMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Alex Johnstone PhD

Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health
Aberdeen

 

Medical Research: What is the background for this study?
Response:

  • Previous work has indicated that high-protein (30% of diet as protein) meat-based weight loss diets are highly satiating, and reduce the free food intake over a four-week period (1,2).
  • There is limited data on assessing the effect of different types of protein on appetite in weight loss studies (3). Previously, a mixed meat source of protein was used in our high protein diets, but this approach has been criticised both from a policy and public health perspective because of potential negative side effects, especially on gut health (4).
  • There is acceptance that vegetable based weight loss diet may offer protection from diseases (5).
  • It may be that alternative vegetable sources of protein could be satiating, and yet maintain a healthy gut during weight loss, and we set up a study to test this, using soya (plant) protein
  1. Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Nieuwenhuizen A, Tomé D, Soenen S, Westerterp KR. Annu Rev Nutr 2009; 29:21-41.
  2. Johnstone AM, Horgan GW, Murison SD, Bremner DM, Lobley GE. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 87(1):44-55.
  3. Due A, Toubro S, Skov AR, Astrup A.. Int J Obes Rel Metab Disord 2004; 28(10):1283-90.
  4. Russell WR, Gratz SW, Duncan SH, Holtrop G, Ince J, Scobbie L, Duncan G, Johnstone AM, Lobley GE, Wallace RJ, et al.. Am J Clin Nutr 2011; 93(5):1062-1072.
  5. Clifton P. Brit J Nutr 2012; 108:122–129.

Medical Research: What are the main findings?
Response:

  • Over the two weeks, subjects lost similar amounts of weight, on average 2.41 and 2.27 kg on the vegetarian high-protein weight loss and meat based high-protein weight loss diets respectively, with similar reduction in fat-mass and preservation of fat-free mass, due to the high protein component.
  • The vegetarian high-protein weight loss had a similar impact on appetite and motivation to eat as the meat based high-protein weight loss diet.
  • Blood biomarkers improved with weight loss for both high protein diets (plasma cholesterol, low density lipoproteins (LDL), high density lipoproteins (HDL), triglycerides and glucose)
  • There was a greater reduction in total cholesterol with the plant based diet for cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. This finding could be attributed to the composition of vegetarian source of protein (soya), (i.e. fibre, phytochemicals, and other micro and macro nutrients).

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Since appetite control and weight loss was similar in both weight loss diets, vegetarian meals are acceptable to  include in a high-protein moderate carbohydrate weight loss diet. In this context, the diets were 30% protein, 30% fat and 40% carbohydrate from energy. A diet that contains mixed sources of protein is acceptable, to feel fuller for longer during calorie restriction for weight loss.

Medical Research: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Alternative plant sources of protein in the context of weight loss is of interest to achieve a healthy body weight but also sustainable sources for the environment. Also the role of dietary protein with carbohydrate in promoting body weight maintenance after weight loss.

Read more here about our research on sustainable protein :  http://www.abdn.ac.uk/rowett/research/strategic-partnership.php

Citation:

Research presented at the Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO) in London, UK

 

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Alex Johnstone PhD, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, & Aberdeen (2015). Vegetarian Protein Sufficient For Appetite Control and Weight Loss 

Higher Protein Intake Linked To Lower Blood Pressure

Lynn L. Moore, DSc, MPH Co-Director, Nutrition and Metabolism Assoc Prof of Medicine Preventive Medicine & Epidemiology Department of Medicine Boston University School of Medicine Boston, MA 02118MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Lynn L. Moore, DSc, MPH
Co-Director, Nutrition and Metabolism
Assoc Prof of Medicine
Preventive Medicine & Epidemiology Department of Medicine
Boston University School of Medicine
Boston, MA 02118

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Response: Our data were derived from 1,361 adults (aged 30-54 years) enrolled in the Framingham Offspring Study and showed that men and women who consumed higher amounts of protein had lower blood pressures (both systolic and diastolic blood pressures) after four years of follow-up. We then followed them for an average of about 11 years and found that those who consumed the most protein (approximately 103 g/day) had about a 40% lower risk of developing high blood pressure than those consuming about half that amount. These beneficial effects were even more pronounced when higher protein intakes were combined with high fiber intakes.
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Diabetes: Whey Protein Before Meals May Improve Glucose Control

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Professor Daniela Jakubowicz MD Diabetes Unit. E. Wolfson Medical Center Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University and Tel Aviv Medical  Center, IsraelMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Professor Daniela Jakubowicz MD
Diabetes Unit. E. Wolfson Medical Center
Sackler Faculty of Medicine,
Tel Aviv University
and Tel Aviv Medical  Center, Israel


Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Prof. Jakubowicz: In type 2 diabetes there is a deficit of post-meal insulin secretion (from pancreatic beta-cells) that  contributes to an exaggerated elevation in blood glucose. In this study we  found that consumption of whey protein shortly before breakfast augmented  GLP-1 (a gut hormone that stimulates insulin secretion) enhancing insulin response and lowering glucose excursions after breakfast.

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