Fewer Heart Attacks and Strokes After Trans-Fat Restriction Laws in New York

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eric J. Brandt, MD Yale University Cardiovascular Disease Fellow

Dr. Eric Brandt

Eric J. Brandt, MD
Yale University
Cardiovascular Disease Fellow

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: From previous studies we know that industrial trans fatty acid (trans fat) consumption is linked to elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Even small amounts of consumption can be deleterious to cardiovascular health. In New York state, there were 11 counties that restricted the use of trans fatty acids in eateries. We compared hospitalization for heart attacks and stroke from 2002 through 2013 in counties that did and did not have restrictions.

Our study found that when comparing populations within New York state that restricted the use of trans fat, compared to those that did not, there was an associated additional decline beyond temporal trends for heart attacks and stroke events combined by 6.2%.

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Americans Continue To Have Better Lipid Profiles

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Asher Rosinger, PHD, MPH
Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Division of Health and Examination Nutrition Examination Surveys, Analysis Branch
National Center for Health Statistic

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels are linked to coronary heart disease and cardiovascular events. Between 1999 and 2010, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL levels declined among U.S. adults. We used new data from the 2011-2014 nationally representative National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to determine if earlier trends continued.

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Not All Transfats Equally Bad

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr Marcus Kleber PhD
Post-doctoral researcher at the Vth Department of Medicine of the Medical Faculty Mannheim Heidelberg University

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Kleber: Most trans fatty acids in our diet are industrially produced.  High concentrations of trans fatty acids are hazardous to human health but whether low concentrations are also harmful has not been studied in detail. We measured trans fatty acids in the erythrocyte membranes of our study participants  and found relatively low levels that were not associated with increased mortality. To the contrary, we found an association with a reduced risk for sudden cardiac death for higher concentrations of the naturally occurring trans fatty acid trans-palmitoleic acid that is ingested with milk and milk products.

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