Flu Linked to Marked Increase in Heart Failure Admissions

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sonja Kytomaa MAResearch AssociateBrigham and Women’s Hospital

Sonja Kytomaa

Sonja Kytomaa MA
Research Associate
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Scott D. Solomon, MDThe Edward D. Frohlich Distinguished ChairProfessor of MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolSenior PhysicianBrigham and Women’s HospitalInternational Associate Editor, European Heart Journal

Dr. Scott Solomon

Scott D. Solomon, MD
The Edward D. Frohlich Distinguished Chair
Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Senior Physician
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
International Associate Editor, European Heart Journal

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Influenza is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, yet few studies have explored the temporal association between influenza activity and hospitalizations, especially due to heart failure (HF).

Our aim with this study was to explore the temporal association between influenza activity and hospitalizations for HF and myocardial infarction (MI) in the general population. We related the number of MI and HF hospitalizations by month, which were sampled from 4 US communities and adjudicated in the surveillance component of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, to monthly influenza-like illness activity, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We found that a 5% increase in influenza activity was associated with a 24% increase in HF hospitalizations rates, while overall influenza was not significantly associated with MI hospitalizations. Influenza activity in the months before hospitalization was not associated with either outcome.

 

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Influenza activity may contribute to the risk of HF hospitalizations in the general population, indicating that influenza activity should be addressed in efforts to prevent hospitalizations for cardiovascular events. Since influenza can influence cardiovascular events, and is, for the most part, preventable with vaccination, high-risk individuals should definitely be vaccinated. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Influenza activity may contribute to the risk of heart hospitalizations in the general population, indicating that influenza activity should be addressed in efforts to prevent hospitalizations for cardiovascular events. Since influenza can influence cardiovascular events, and is, for the most part, preventable with vaccination, high-risk individuals should definitely be vaccinated. 

Citation:

Kytömaa S, Hegde S, Claggett B, et al. Association of Influenza-like Illness Activity With Hospitalizations for Heart FailureThe Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities StudyJAMA Cardiol. Published online March 27, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2019.0549

 

Mar 27, 2019 @ 3:13 pm

 

 

 

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