Anemia Increases Mortality From Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Raphae Barlas M.A
3rd year MBChB student
The Institute of Applied Health Sciences
Aberdeen

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Anemia and stroke are both common conditions. While previous studies have found an association between anemia on admission and increased mortality in stroke patients, this was not consistent throughout the literature. We aimed to comprehensively assess this association by conducting our own observational study, consisting of 8000 patients from UK regional stroke registry data. We then aggregated our findings into a systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing literature for a total study population of approximately 30,000 patients.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: We found that anemia on admission increased of the risk of mortality in ischemic stroke (clotted blood vessel) two-fold. Likewise, patients with hemorrhagic stroke (ruptured blood vessel) who were anemic on admission were 1.5 times more likely to die. These results were derived from a meta-analysis which included studies that adjusting for a large number of confounders and originated from a diverse array of countries. This increased the reliability and generalizability of our findings.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future studies should focus on assessing the efficacy of interventions which treat the underlying cause of anemia in stroke patients. For example, iron supplements, vitamin B12 supplements or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in those with iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency and chronic kidney disease respectively.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
Impact of Hemoglobin Levels and Anemia on Mortality in Acute Stroke: Analysis of UK Regional Registry Data, Systematic Review, and Meta‐Analysis.

J Am Heart Assoc.2016; 5: e003019originally published August 17, 2016doi: 10.1161/JAHA.115.003019
Raphae S. Barlas, MA (Hons

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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