Is There a Link Between Iron Intake and Stroke?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dipender Gill Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust London, United Kingdom 

Dipender Gill

Dipender Gill
Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
London, United Kingdon 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Iron status has previously been associated with risk of various types of cardiovascular disease, including stroke. However, the observational research methodologies that identified these associations can be affected by confounding from environmental factors and reverse causation.

We used randomly allocated genetic variants that affect iron status to investigate its effect on risk of different types of ischemic stroke, and found evidence to support that higher iron status increases risk of cardioembolic stroke.

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Mediterranean Diet Linked To Stroke Risk Reduction in Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Vegetables” by Wagner T. Cassimiro "Aranha" is licensed under CC BY 2.0Professor Phyo Kyaw Myint MBBS MD FRCP(Edin) FRCP(Lond)
Clinical Chair in Medicine of Old Age
Academic Lead: Ageing Clinical & Experimental Research &
Director of Clinical Academic Training Development
The Lead Academic, Aberdeen Clinical Academic Training (ACAT) Programmes
School of Medicine, Medical Sciences & Nutrition
College of Life Sciences & Medicine, University of Aberdeen

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: While Mediterranean Diet has been linked to reduced stroke risk it remains unclear
(1) its impact on populations within non-Mediterranean countries;
(2) its specific impact on different gender;
(3) the effect observed when using more robust dietary assessments; and (4) which specific components of the diet are most protective.

We therefore studied more than 23 thousand men and women (mainly British Caucasian) aged 40 years or older in Norfolk, UK as part of EPIC-Norfolk study and we found that the greater adherence to Mediterranean dietary pattern is linked to a significant reduction in stroke risk in women but not in men. This benefit was seen across the whole middle and older age population (particularly for women) regardless of their existing risk factors such as high blood pressure.

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Amphetamines Do Not Enhance Recovery After Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FANA, FAHA Ruth L. Works Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurology Co-Director, Kentucky Neuroscience Institute KY Clinic - University of Kentucky Lexington, KY 40536

Dr. Goldstein

Larry B. Goldstein, MD, FAAN, FANA, FAHA
Ruth L. Works Professor and Chairman, Department of Neurology
Co-Director, Kentucky Neuroscience Institute
KY Clinic – University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY 40536

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Extensive work in laboratory models over several decades show that d-amphetamine, combined with task-relevant experience, can facilitate recovery after stroke and traumatic brain injury affecting the cerebral cortex.

Results from clinical trials have been inconsistent, in part because preclinical data indicate that the effect of amphetamines as part of a regimen for stroke recovery is biologically complex.  We conducted this multicenter pilot study to explore some of that complexity.

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Ultra-Early Deterioration Predicts Poor Outcome in Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kristina Shkirkova

Kristina Shkirkova

Kristina Shkirkova
Doctoral Student in Neuroscience
Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute
University of Southern California
Los Angeles, CA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Stroke is the second leading cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability worldwide. Stroke onset is sudden with symptoms progressing rapidly in the first hours after onset. The course of symptom progression after stroke is not well studied in the ultra-early window before hospital arrival and during early postarrival period.

There is an urgent need to characterize the frequency, predictors, and outcomes of neurologic deterioration among stroke patients in the earliest time window.

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Algorithm Allows Patients To Calculate Their Risk of Stroke and Heart Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Doug Manuel MD, MSc, FRCPC Professor and Senior Scientist Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | L’Institut de Recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa Départment de Médicine Familiale Université d’Ottawa 

Dr. Manuel

Dr. Doug Manuel MD, MSc, FRCPC
Professor and Senior Scientist
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute | L’Institut de Recherche de l’Hôpital d’Ottawa
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa
Départment de Médicine Familiale
Université d’Ottawa 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: A lot of people are interested in healthy living, but often we don’t have that discussion in the doctor’s office,” says Dr. Manuel, who is also a professor at the University of Ottawa. “Doctors will check your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but they don’t necessarily ask about lifestyle factors that could put you at risk of a heart attack and stroke. We hope this tool can help people — and their care team — with better information about healthy living and options for reducing their risk of heart attack and stroke.”

“What sets this cardiovascular risk calculator apart is that it looks at healthy living, and it is better calibrated to the Canadian population,” says Dr. Doug Manuel, lead author, senior scientist at The Ottawa Hospital and a senior core scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).”  Continue reading

Study Finds No Link Between Dairy Fats and Heart Disease or Mortality

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Milk” by Mike Mozart is licensed under CC BY 2.0Marcia C. de Oliveira Otto, PhD, FAHA
Assistant Professor
Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences
University of Texas
Houston, TX 77030-3900 |

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Our research adds to a growing body of evidence showing no harm in relation to heart disease or overall mortality associated with consumption of whole-fat dairy foods.

The findings also indicate that one of three fatty acids present in dairy fat was linked to lower risk of stroke among older adults. To the best of our knowledge, ours was the first large study to use repeated measures of fatty acids over time and evaluate association with mortality in older adults, which allowed us to expand and contribute to this important debate regarding fat intake and health.

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How Quickly and Accurately Can Ischemic Stroke Be Diagnosed and Treated with tPA?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Perttu J. Lindsberg, MD, PhD Professor of Neurology Clinical Neurosciences and Molecular Neurology Research Programs Unit, Biomedicum Helsinki University of Helsinki Helsinki, Finland

Dr. Lindsberg

Perttu JLindsberg, MD, PhD
Professor of Neurology
Clinical Neurosciences and Molecular Neurology
Research Programs Unit, Biomedicum Helsinki
University of Helsinki Helsinki, Finland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The past 20 years in shaping the Helsinki model in stroke thrombolysis have proven that we can be very fast in examining the patient, completing the imaging and starting thrombolytic therapy. This is a university hospital center that receives roughly three stroke suspects per day for evaluation of recanalization therapies. Already seven years ago we were able to push the median ’door-to-needle’ time permanently below 20 minutes. What we had not been monitoring was how well we had kept up the accuracy of our emergengy department (ED) diagnostic process. Prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) have been trained to focus on suspecting thrombolysis-eligible stroke and we usually get also pre-notifications of arriving stroke code patients during transportation, but the diagnosis on admission is an independent clinical judgment as the CT findings are largely nondiagnostic for acute changes.

The admission evaluation of suspected acute stroke is therefore a decisive neurologic checkpoint, building the success of acute treatments such as recanalization therapy, but is complicated by differential diagnosis between true manifestations of stroke and numerous mimicking conditions. Although we have invested a lot on training and standardized ED procedures, time pressure and therapy-geared expectations may blur the diagnostic process.

With this background, we embarked on an in-depth-analysis of the admission and final diagnoses of stroke code patients, as well as misdiagnoses, immediate treatment decisions and their consequences.

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Under New Lower Blood Pressure Guidelines, More Stroke Victims Would Survive

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Alain Lekoubou Looti, MD Msc Clinical Neurophysiology Department of Neurosciences College of Medicine Medical University of South Carolina

Dr. Lekoubou

Dr. Alain Lekoubou Looti, MD Msc
Clinical Neurophysiology
Department of Neurosciences
College of Medicine
Medical University of South Carolina

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Hypertension is strongly associated with stroke. Individuals who suffer a stroke are more likely to have another stroke. They also die at a rate twice as high as those who experience a first event. We have evidence that treating hypertension reduces the risk of recurrence stroke among stroke survivors.

Prior hypertension guidelines defined hypertension for a systolic blood pressure (top number) equal or greater than 140 and a diastolic blood pressure (lower number) equal or greater than 90. The American college of cardiology/American heart association have published a new guideline to help healthcare providers identify and treat blood pressure including among stroke survivors. The threshold to define blood pressure has been lowered to 130 for the top number and 80 for the lower number for everyone. Unlike the general population, pharmacological treatment for stroke survivors is now recommended for systolic blood pressure greater than or equal than 130 and diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 80. In the same line achieving a blood pressure of less than 130/80 mmHg in stroke survivors is now recommended. In the stroke community, there has been mounting evidence to suggest that achieving lower blood pressure goal was desirable. When the new guidelines were published, we could not wait any longer to see the impact of the new guidelines on the proportion of stroke survivors with hypertension, recommended pharmacological treatment, and above blood pressure target. We were also curious to see how the new guidelines would potentially affect mortality among stroke survivors. 

We have found that the new guidelines would result in a nearly 67% (from 29.9% to 49.8%) to relative increase in the proportion of U.S. stroke survivors diagnosed with hypertension and 54% (from 36.3% to 56%) relative increase in those not within the recommended BP target.  We have also found that if the new guidelines were applied, this would result in a 33% relative drop in mortality.  Continue reading

Benefits of Implementing 2017 Hypertension Guidelines Would Outweigh Side Effects

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-Jiang He

Dr. Jiang He

Jiang He, MD, PhD
Joseph S. Copes Chair of Epidemiology, Professor
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
Tulane University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

 

Response: The 2017 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association hypertension guideline recommended lower blood pressure cut points for initiating antihypertensive medication and treatment goals than the previous hypertension guideline. We estimated the prevalence of hypertension and the proportion of the US adult population recommended for antihypertensive treatment according to the 2017 hypertension guideline. More importantly, we estimated the risk reductions of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, as well as increases in adverse events, assuming the entire US adult population achieved the 2017 guideline-recommended systolic blood pressure treatment goals of less than 130 mmHg.

Our study indicated the prevalence of hypertension was 45.4%, representing 105 million US adults with hypertension, according to the 2017 hypertension guideline. In addition, the proportion of individuals recommended for antihypertensive treatment was 35.9% or 83 million US adults.

Based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, antihypertensive clinical trials, and US population-based cohort studies, we estimated 610 thousand cardiovascular disease events and 334 thousand total deaths could be prevented annually in the US population if the 2017 hypertension guideline systolic blood pressure treatment goals were achieved in the entire US population.

Compared to full implementation of the previous hypertension guideline, we estimated the 2017 hypertension guideline recommendations would reduce an additional 340 thousand cardiovascular disease events and 156 thousand deaths per year in the US.

Implementing the 2017 hypertension guideline was estimated to increase 62 thousand hypotension, 32 thousand syncope, 31 thousand electrolyte abnormality, and 79 thousand acute kidney injury or kidney failure events.

These analyses indicated implementing the 2017 hypertension guideline would significantly increase the proportion of US adults recommended for antihypertensive treatment and further reduce cardiovascular disease events and all-cause mortality, but might increase the number of adverse events in the US population. Continue reading

Oral Anticoagulants Still Underused in AFib Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Anna Gundlund, MD, PhD

Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, Department of Cardiology
Denmark 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Atrial fibrillation increases a person’s risk of ischemic strokes up to 5-fold. Oral anticoagulation therapy lowers this risk effectively (>60%) and is therefore recommended for patients with atrial fibrillation and at least 1-2 other risk factors for stroke.

Our study show, that oral anticoagulation therapy is still underused in patients with atrial fibrillation – even after a stroke event. In stroke survivors with atrial fibrillation, oral anticoagulation therapy were associated with better outcomes than no oral anticoagulation therapy.  Continue reading

Benefits of Clopidogrel and Aspirin In Minor Stroke and High-Risk TIA

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. S. Claiborne "Clay" Johnston MD, PhD Dean Vice President for Medical Affairs Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair Dell Medical School The University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Johnston

Dr. S. Claiborne “Clay” Johnston MD, PhD
Dean
Vice President for Medical Affairs
Frank and Charmaine Denius Distinguished Dean’s Chair
Dell Medical School
The University of Texas at Austin

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Prior studies have shown that the risk of a stroke or other ischemic events is high in the days to weeks after a TIA or minor stroke.

We sought to test whether blocking platelet aggregation more effectively with clopidogrel plus aspirin could reduce this risk compared to aspirin alone.  We found that the combination did reduce risk of major ischemic events.  It also showed a small increase in risk of major hemorrhage, but for most people the benefits would outweigh the potential risk.

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Stroke: Which Clot Buster Drug Works Best?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

A/Prof Bruce Campbell MBBS(Hons), BMedSc, PhD, FRACP

Dr. Campbell

A/Prof Bruce Campbell MBBS(Hons), BMedSc, PhD, FRACP
Consultant Neurologist, Head of Stroke
Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital
Principal Research Fellow,Melbourne Brain Centre @ RMH
Department of Medicine
University of Melbourne Australia 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Patients with stroke due to a large blood vessel in the brain receive a clot-dissolving medication followed by clot retrieval surgery performed via an angiogram. The standard clot dissolving medication “alteplase” rarely opens the artery prior to clot retrieval surgery. Tenecteplase is genetically modified form of alteplase that may be more effective and is widely available (it is the standard clot dissolving medication used for heart attacks). It can be given over 10 seconds instead of the 1 hour required to infuse alteplase, meaning that patients can be transferred between hospitals to receive treatment more easily. Tenecteplase is also less expensive than alteplase.

In EXTEND-IA TNK we found that tenecteplase doubles the number of patients who have blood flow restored to the brain earlier than is possible with clot retrieval surgery (22% vs 10%) and improves patient outcomes compared to the current standard medication called alteplase.

1 in 5 tenecteplase treated patients have blood flow rapidly restored and do not require clot retrieval surgery compared to 1 in 10 with alteplase.

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Is Sickle Cell Really a Risk Factor for Stroke?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with :

Dr. Hyacinth I Hyacinth MD Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, Emory Children’s Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine Atlanta, GA 30322

Dr. Hyacinth

Dr. Hyacinth I Hyacinth MD
Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorder Center, Emory Children’s Center, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, GA 30322

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

This study was conducted against the backdrop of a significantly higher risk for stroke among African Americans compared to non-Hispanic Whites, despite adjusting for traditional risk factors. Also, sickle cell disease is a well-known genetic risk factor for stroke and recent studies show that sickle cell trait is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism, all of which are potential risk factors for stroke.

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With Brain Microbleeds, Can Patients Tolerate Lower Blood Pressure?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Joshua Goldstein

Dr. Joshua Goldstein

Dr. Joshua Goldstein MD, PhD
J. Philip Kistler Stroke Research Center
Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology MGH
Harvard Medical School, Boston Department of Emergency Medicine
Massachusetts General Hospital
for the Antihypertensive Treatment of Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage 2 (ATACH-2) and the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials (NETT) Network Investigators  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: It’s hard to know how aggressively to lower blood pressure in acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).  Randomized controlled trials have been conflicting. We thought that we could use the presence of severe small vessel disease (SVD) – manifested by microbleeds seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – to guide treatment decisions.  On the one hand, those with severe SVD may be most vulnerable to continued bleeding, and specifically need more intensive blood pressure lowering.  On the other hand, if they have impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow, they might be harmed by rapid drops in blood pressure, and maybe we have to be more careful with them.

To answer this, we performed a subgroup analysis of the multi-centre ATACH-2 clinical trial of intensive blood pressure lowering. This was the first study to assess the effect of randomized acute stroke treatment on patients with more severe SVD, manifested by microbleeds.  We found that no matter what your small vessel disease burden on MRI, you’ll respond the same to early blood pressure management.

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Migraine Linked To Increased Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Islam Elgendy MD Division of Cardiovascular Medicine University of Florida  

Dr. Elgendy

Islam Elgendy MD
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine
University of Florida  

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Migraine headache is a prevalent medical condition, often being chronic and debilitating to many. Previous studies have shown that migraine, particularly migraine with aura, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Recently, a number of these studies have reported long-term follow up data. To better understand the long-term morbidity that is associated with migraines, we performed a systematic evaluation to study the link between migraine and risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events.

This study demonstrated that migraine is associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, which was driven by an increased long-term risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. This effect was predominantly observed in migraineurs who have aura.  Continue reading

Stroke: Mr Clean Study of Endovascular Treatment

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
J.H.L. Mulder, MD PhD
Neurology resident
Erasmus MC 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Current information about safety and efficacy of endovascular treatment (EVT) for acute ischemic stroke is primarily derived from patients treated in the setting of a randomized controlled trial. However, inherent to this setting, external validity of the results can be jeopardized by patient selection and intensive monitoring.

Therefore, an important question remained unanswered: could the positive effect of endovascular treatment be reproduced in standard clinical practice?  Continue reading

Arm Cycling Can Improve Walking After Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with

Paul Zehr PhD Professor & Director Centre for Biomedical Research, Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, McKinnon Division of Medical Sciences Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD)| Affiliate, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, UBC

Dr. Zehr

E. Paul Zehr PhD
Professor & Director
Centre for Biomedical Research,
Rehabilitation Neuroscience Laboratory, McKinnon
Division of Medical Sciences
Exercise Science, Physical & Health Education
International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (ICORD)|
Affiliate, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, UBC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: For many years we explored the role of the spinal cord in regulating rhythmic arm and leg movements like we do during walking, running and swimming.  Although we humans tend to move and locomote around on our two legs as bipeds, we are basically quadrupeds in terms of how our nervous system controls our limbs during walking. We have an extensive network of brain and spinal cord connections that help coordinate our limbs while we move. A lot of our work showed that using the arms rhythmically, like during arm cycling, strongly affected the activity of the spinal cord controlling leg muscles. Getting the spinal cord for leg muscles more coordinated and activated is a major goal of rehabilitation  of walking after neurotrauma so we wanted to see if training the arms could help with this. This is particularly important because a lot of the time, the arms are not engaged at all in rehabilitation training for the legs.

We found that after only 5 weeks of arm cycling (3 x 30 minutes each week), neural excitability, strength, and leg function were increased along with enhanced clinical tests of balance and walking ability.

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Some Heart Attack Patients Without AFib Still at Increased Risk of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Normal rhythm tracing (top) Atrial fibrillation (bottom) Wikipedia image

Normal rhythm tracing (top) Atrial fibrillation (bottom)
Wikipedia image

João Pedro Ferreira, MD, PhD &
Faiez Zannad, MD, PhD
National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM)Center for Clinical Multidisciplinary Research 1433INSERM U1116University of LorraineRegional University Hospital of NancyFrench Clinical Research Infrastructure Network (F-CRIN) Investigation Network Initiative–Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists, Nancy, France
Department of Physiology and Cardiothoracic SurgeryCardiovascular Research and Development UnitFaculty of MedicineUniversity of Porto, Porto, Portugal

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: It is uncertain whether patients with a myocardial infarction with systolic dysfunction but without atrial fibrillation have increased risk for stroke.

In this study including >22,000 patients and 600 stroke events we found a subgroup of patients at high risk for stroke despite not having atrial fibrillation. These patients are older, have worse renal function, frank signs of pulmonary congestion, hypertension and previous stroke history. We created a simple and “ready to use” score that allows the identification of these patients in routine clinical practice.  Continue reading

Real World Studies Compares Dabigatran with Rivaroxaban or Apixaban in Nonvalvular AFib

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Todd C. Villines, M.D. FSCCT Professor of Medicine Uniformed Services University School of Medicine Director of Cardiovascular Research and Cardiac CT Cardiology Fellowship Program Director Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda, Maryland Assistant Professor of Medicine Georgetown School of Medicine

Dr. Villines

Todd C. Villines, M.D. FSCCT
Professor of Medicine
Uniformed Services University School of Medicine
Director of Cardiovascular Research and Cardiac CT
Cardiology Fellowship Program Director
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Bethesda, Maryland
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Georgetown School of Medicine

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: This study was a retrospective, observational real-world analysis assessing the safety and effectiveness of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) treated through the U.S. Department of Defense Military Health System. The study examined major bleeding and stroke rates in NVAF patients who had initiated treatment with dabigatran compared to those treated with rivaroxaban or apixaban.

The study examined two cohorts: one that resulted in 12,763 propensity score matched dabigatran (150 mg bid) and rivaroxaban (20 mg daily) patients, and another that resulted in 4,802 propensity score matched dabigatran (150 mg bid) and apixaban (5 mg bid) patients. Dabigatran patients demonstrated lower rates of major bleeding compared to rivaroxaban patients (2.08 percent vs 2.53) percent and similar rates of stroke (0.60 percent vs 0.78 percent). In the exploratory analysis, dabigatran and apixaban patients showed similar rates of major bleeding (1.60 percent vs 1.21 percent) and stroke (0.44 percent vs 0.35 percent). Continue reading

Migraine Linked To Increased Risk of Stroke, AFib, PE and Cardiovascular Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
“Headache.” by Avenue G is licensed under CC BY 2.0
Kasper Adelborg, MD, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Clinical Epidemiology
Aarhus University Hospital 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Around one billion people worldwide are affected by migraine. Migraine has considerable impact on quality of life and imposes a substantial burden on society. Migraine is primarily a headache disorder, but previous studies have suggested a link between migraine and stroke and myocardial infarction, particularly among women, while the link between migraine and other heart problems are less well known.

In this large register-based Danish study published in the BMJ, we confirmed that migraine is associated with increased risks of stroke and myocardial infarction, but we also found that migraine was associated with increased risks of other cardiovascular diseases (specifically, venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation). Migraine was not associated with increased risks of heart failure or peripheral artery disease.

In contrast to most previous studies, our study had a very large sample size and an age- and sex- matched comparison cohort from the general population, which allowed us to put migraine in a population context and to perform several subgroup analyses. Here, we found several interesting findings.

  • In general, the associations were strongest in the first year after diagnosis but persisted in the long term (up to 19 years after diagnosis).
  • Most associations applied to both migraine patients with aura (warning signs before a migraine, such as seeing flashing lights) and in those without aura, and in both women and in men. 

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Could NOACs Be Better Option Than Warfarin To Prevent Ischemic Stroke?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Taku Inohara MD Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine Tokyo, Japan Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC 

Dr. Taku Inohara

Taku Inohara MD
Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine
Tokyo, Japan
Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are increasingly prescribed for high-risk patients with atrial fibrillation because they have fewer bleeding complications than warfarin. However, they still pose a risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). It was unclear if patients with preceding use of NOACs who experienced an ICH were at greater risk of death than patients with no oral anticoagulant (OAC)  or patients who received warfarin.

Using the GWTG-Stroke registry, we found that, while prior use of both NOACs and warfarin was associated with a greater risk of in-hospital mortality than no OAC, patients with prior use of NOACs were more likely to have favorable outcomes than patients with prior use of warfarin. In addition, the lower mortality in NOACs compared with warfarin was more likely to be prominent in patients with dual antiplatelet agents than those without antiplatelet therapy.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: High risk patients with atrial fibrillation have to be taking anticoagulation anyway, even ICH occurs, NOACs could still be a better option than warfarin to prevent ischemic stroke.

Physicians should consider NOACs as a safer anticoagulant strategy than warfarin in terms of the severity of their most devastating complication, despite lack of antidotes for current NOACs. 

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this work?

Response: Our findings have the potential to inform future treatment selection when oral anticoagulation is warranted. Future study needs to clarify the temporal trend of OAC-related ICH in parallel of the implementation of NOACs and focus on how the widespread use of NOACs affect the outcome of patients experiencing OAC-related ICH.  

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The GWTG-Stroke program is provided by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA). This study is in part supported by the ARAMIS registry with research funding from Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Genentech, Inc., and Janssen. 

Citations:

Inohara T, Xian Y, Liang L, Matsouaka RA, Saver JL, Smith EE, Schwamm LH, Reeves MJ, Hernandez AF, Bhatt DL, Peterson ED, Fonarow GC. Association of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Among Patients Taking Non–Vitamin K Antagonist vs Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants With In-Hospital Mortality. JAMA. Published online January 25, 2018. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.21917

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Aspiration Therapy Offers Alternative To Stent Retrievers For Large Vessel Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. J. Mocco, MD Professor Neurosurgery Mount Sinai Beth Israel  Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West The Mount Sinai Hospital

Dr. Mocco

Dr. J. Mocco, MD
Professor Neurosurgery
Mount Sinai Beth Israel
Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West
The Mount Sinai Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Numerous trials have demonstrated that Endovascular therapy is strongly beneficial for emergent large vessel stroke patients.

The majority of patients in those trials were treated with Stent retrievers.  COMPASS was designed to evaluate a different type of Endovascular therapy called aspiration Thrombectomy.  Continue reading

Robotics Can Be Used To Train Brain To Recover Hand Use After Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

The Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) setup applied in this study. Participants imagine opening their hand without actually making any movement while their hand is placed in a device that passively opens and closes their fingers as it receives the necessary input from their brain activity.

The Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) setup applied in this study. Participants imagine opening their hand without actually making any movement while their hand is placed in a device that passively opens and closes their fingers as it receives the necessary input from their brain activity.

Professor Alireza Gharabaghi
Univ.-Prof. Dr. med. Alireza Gharabaghi
Ärztlicher Leiter
Sektion Funktionelle und Restaurative Neurochirurgie
Neurochirurgische Universitätsklinik
Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: According to the World Health Organization, 15 million people suffer stroke worldwide each year. Of these, 5 million die and another 5 million are permanently disabled. Stroke is the leading cause of serious, long-term disability. About half of all stroke survivors will never be able to use their affected hand for activities of daily living again.

The current study investigates a novel technology which may lead to new therapeutic options for these patients. 

Continue reading

General Anesthesia vs Conscious Sedation for Endovascular Therapy of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD Department of Neurology Aarhus University Hospital

Dr. Simonsen

Dr. Claus Z. Simonsen, MD, PhD
Department of Neurology
Aarhus University Hospital

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Retrospective studies find worse outcome when performing (Endovascular Therapy) EVT under General Anesthesia (GA).

The main finding is that infarct growth in the Conscious Sedation (CS) and GA are not different. And that patients who had EVT under GA had a better outcome after 90 days. This is probably explained by better reperfusion rates under GA which was another part of the study that was surprising. Our neurointerventionalist are comfortable performing EVT under CS, but our study indicates that maybe it is easier to achieve reperfusion it the patient is anesthesized.

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Feasibility of Anticoagulating Cancer Patients At Increased Risk of Stroke

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Babak B. Navi MD, MS

Dr. Navi

Babak B. Navi MD, MS
Department of Neurology
Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, New York

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: About 10% of patients with ischemic stroke have comorbid cancer and these patients face an increased risk of stroke recurrence. Many strokes in patients with cancer are attributed to unconventional mechanisms from acquired hypercoagulability. Therefore, many physicians recommend anticoagulation, especially low molecular weight heparins, for the treatment of cancer-associated stroke. However, hypercoagulable stroke mechanisms, such as nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, are rarely definitively diagnosed in cancer patients antemortem; while atherosclerosis, which is generally treated with antiplatelet medicines such as aspirin, is common in cancer patients. In addition, many historic indications for anticoagulation in ischemic stroke have been disproven by randomized trials because any reductions in stroke risk were offset by increased risks of bleeding. Given these considerations, we believed that a randomized trial comparing anticoagulation with enoxaparin to antiplatelet therapy with aspirin was necessary to determine the superior strategy, prompting implementation of the TEACH pilot randomized trial. The primary aim of TEACH was to determine whether the random assignment of different antithrombotic strategies to cancer patients with acute ischemic stroke would be sufficiently feasible and safe to proceed with a larger efficacy trial.  Continue reading