Bisphenol A May Promote Obesity By Interfering with Leptin Early in Life

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Alfonso Abizaid PhD

Department of Neuroscience
Carleton University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a compound considered to be a potential environmental hazard and an endocrine disruptor. We have found an association between exposure to BPA at levels that are considered safe by Health Canada and the EPA early in life, and the development of obesity. In addition, we found that this propensity to develop obesity is due to under development of the hypothalamic projection field of POMC neurons, a set of neurons that regulate satiety and stimulate metabolic rate.

In this paper we replicate those findings and also show that this abnormal development is due to BPA altering the secretion of the hormone leptin at critical times where this hormone is important for the post-natal development of these POMC neurons.

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Prenatal BPA Exposure Linked To Childhood Obesity

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr-Lori-A-Hoepner

Dr. Lori Hoepner

Lori A. Hoepner, DrPH
Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Columbia University
New York, NY 10032

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Hoepner: The Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health was funded starting in 1998.  Pregnant African American and Dominican mothers residing in Northern Manhattan and the South Bronx were enrolled from 1998 to 2006, and mothers and their children have been followed since this time.  We collected urine samples from the pregnant mothers in their third trimester and from the children at ages 3 and 5.  At ages 5 and 7 we measured the height and weight of the children, and at age 7 we also measured body fat and waist circumference.

MedicalResearch.com:  What are the main findings?

Dr. Hoepner:  We found a significant association between increased prenatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) and increases in childhood body fat measures of waist circumference and percent body fat at age 7.  Our research builds on earlier findings of an association between prenatal exposure to BPA and body fat in children up to age 4, and this is the first study to report an association at age 7.

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Tooth Enamel Defects May Reflect Perinatal Exposure to Bisphenol A

Sylvie Babajko, PhD Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers Inserm UMR_S 1138 Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Orale Moléculaire 75006 Paris cedex 06MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Sylvie Babajko, PhD
Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers
Inserm UMR_S 1138
Laboratoire de Physiopathologie Orale Moléculaire
75006 Paris cedex 06

MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Babajko: The environment has become increasingly contaminated by various pollutants. This has led to an increase in the incidence and gravity of known pathologies and/or the emergence of new pathologies. In 2001, a distinct enamel pathology called molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) was described. It is diagnosed by white to brown creamy lesions affecting permanent first molars and frequently permanent incisors too. These teeth are sensitive and susceptible to caries. MIH prevalence turns around 15-18 % of 6 to 9 years-old children in studied populations all over the world. To date, MIH etiology remains unclear. However, given that MIH affects those teeth that are undergoing mineralization around the time of birth, MIH is indicative of some adverse event(s) occurring during early childhood that impact on enamel development. Interestingly, susceptibility to BPA in human is the highest during the same period of time.

Our experimental data (1, 2) showed that BPA may be a causal agent of MIH and that BPA irreversibly impacts amelogenesis via steroid hormone pathway. Continue reading

Bisphenol A Linked To Oxidative Stress in Pregnancy

Vasantha Padmanabhan, MS, PhD Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and Environmental Health Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mi 48109MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Vasantha Padmanabhan, MS, PhD

Professor, Departments of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and Environmental Health Sciences
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Mi 48109

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Controversy exists regarding the human health effects of bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting industrial chemical, present in plastic products, baby bottles, food can liners, and wide array of paper products including cash receipts. BPA has been linked to adverse metabolic effects, including obesity, diabetes and cardiac disease.  This study examined if exposure to bisphenol A during pregnancy, at levels humans are exposed to, induces oxidative stress, a major contributor to the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Findings from this multi species study show an association between higher maternal- and cord-blood BPA levels and 3-nitrotyrosine Y (NY), a marker of oxidative stress, in 24 pregnant women. Similar effect on oxidative stress was also found when human-comparable BPA doses were given to pregnant sheep and rats. Similarity of findings between BPA exposure and oxidative stress in the human association study and animals testing study raises concern about potential risk of BPA later in life.

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BPA Exposure During Pregnancy Linked With Childhood Wheezing

Adam Spanier, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAP Associate Professor of Pediatrics Division Head, General Pediatrics & Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Medical Director, Pediatrics at Midtown Department of Pediatrics University of Maryland Midtown Campus Baltimore, MD 21201MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Adam Spanier, MD, PhD, MPH, FAAP
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Division Head, General Pediatrics & Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Medical Director, Pediatrics at Midtown Department of Pediatrics
University of Maryland Midtown Campus Baltimore, MD 21201

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Spanier: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is present in many consumer products (lining of canned foods, some plastics, some receipt paper, etc).

We found that higher maternal Bisphenol A levels during pregnancy were associated with increased odds of persistent wheezing in children and a decrease in lung function at age four. Child BPA levels were not associated with these poor lung health outcomes.
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Bisphenol A: Lose Dose Effects

Laura N. Vandenberg, PhD Assistant Professor University of Massachusetts – Amherst School of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health Science Amherst, MA  01003MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Laura N. Vandenberg, PhD
Assistant Professor
University of Massachusetts – Amherst School of Public Health,
Division of Environmental Health Science
Amherst, MA  01003

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Vandenberg: Back in 2007, a group of 38 researchers wrote the Chapel Hill consensus statement about BPA (vom Saal et al. Reproductive Toxicology 2007). We also wrote 5 separate review articles summarizing what was known at the time about

  • 1) BPA and cancer;
  • 2) BPA and its effects on wildlife animals and in environmental matrices (air, water, soil, etc.);
  • 3) BPA and molecular mechanisms in cultured cells;
  • 4) BPA levels in humans and their exposure sources;
  • 5) BPA’s effects on laboratory animals.

    Several of these groups analyzed what effects BPA has at “low doses”, i.e. at doses below those tested in traditional toxicology studies. (These are doses that are thought to be “safe” for animals and humans.)
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