Kidney Transplant: Alternative Immunosuppressant Regimens with Belatacept (NULOJIX®) May Improve Outcomes

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Rita R. Alloway, PharmD, FCCP Research Professor of Medicine Director, Transplant Clinical Research University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine Division of Nephrology  Kidney C.A.R.E. Program  (Clinical Advancement, Research & Education) Cincinnati OH 45267

Dr. Alloway

Rita R. Alloway, PharmD, FCCP
Research Professor of Medicine
Director, Transplant Clinical Research
University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine
Division of Nephrology
Kidney C.A.R.E. Program
(Clinical Advancement, Research & Education)
Cincinnati OH 45267 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Transplant recipients are required to take lifelong immunosuppression to sustain the function of their transplant.  Unfortunately these immunosuppressants have significant side effects.  The most significant of these side effects are worsening kidney function, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, post transplant diabetes, tremors and headaches.  Researchers focused on improving post transplant outcomes are looking for immunosuppressant regimens with similar efficacy while minimizing harmful side effects.

Tacrolimus and steroids are the immunosuppressants associated with the worst side effect profiles.  This study eliminated both of these immunosuppressants and replace tacrolimus with belatacept.  Belatacept is a once monthly intravenous infusion with a more favorable side effect profile compared to tacrolimus.  In addition, since it is a monthly infusion, adherence can improved compared to an oral medication taken twice daily.

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Less Smoking Linked to Lower Antibody Levels in Modern Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Pr Gilles Boire, M.D., M. ScService de rhumatologie Département de médecine Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé Université de Sherbrooke

Prof. Boire

Pr Gilles Boire, M.D., M. ScService de rhumatologie
Département de médecine
Faculté de médecine et des sciences de la santé
Université de Sherbrooke

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are heterogeneous at initial presentation, in response to treatments and according to their outcomes. No clinical features and very few biomarkers, except autoantibodies such as anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptides/Proteins (CCP), identify patients with divergent prognostic trajectories.

To help improve early prognostic classification, we initiated 20 years ago the single center longitudinal observational Early Undifferentiated PolyArthritis (EUPA) study of consecutive patients presenting with recent-onset inflammatory polyarthritis, 90% of which fulfill classification criteria for RA at baseline. Our registry includes 739 very early RA patients (median symptom duration 3.6 months), rapidly treated to joint remission (i.e. 0/66 swollen joint) and followed over 5 years. Each patient visit is linked to biosamples and to sequential radiographs scored according to the modified Sharp/van der Heijde method. As we had the clinical impression that clinical features of recruited patients were evolving, we compared patients from 3 periods (1998-2004; 2005-2010; 2011-2017).  Continue reading