Public Database Tracks Efficacy of Deep Brain Stimulation in Tourette Syndrome

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael S. Okun, M.D. Adelaide Lackner Professor and Chair of Neurology Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases Gainesville FL 32607

Dr. Okun

Michael S. Okun, M.D.
Adelaide Lackner Professor and Chair of Neurology
Fixel Center for Neurological Diseases
Gainesville FL 32607

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Deep brain stimulation is a promising therapy for carefully selected Tourette syndrome patients who fail medication and behavioral therapy. This study draws data from 31 institutions and 10 countries and shows a significant improvement of motor and vocal tics across multiple brain targets.  Because even expert DBS centers only perform 1-2 surgeries a year this type of database and registry will be critical to move the field forward.  Continue reading

Study Finds Modest Survival Increase in Parkinson’s Patients Who Receive Deep Brain Stimulation

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Dr. Frances M. Weaver PhD
Hines VA Hospital
Center of Innovation for Complex Chronic Healthcare
Hines, IL 60141

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Research has shown that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson’s disease (PD) improves motor function and this improvement is sustained. There is also improvement in quality of life after DBS. However, it is not known whether DBS also effects survival. A few studies that have examined survival have had mixed results.

In the current study we compared survival for a large cohort of persons with Parkinson’s disease who underwent DBS to a match group of persons with PD who were managed medically.

We found a modest improvement in survival for persons with Parkinson’s disease who underwent DBS compared to individuals who did not.

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Refined Deep Brain Stimulation Turns On ‘As Needed’ To Treat Tremors

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Howard Jay Chizeck ScD Professor, Electrical Engineering Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering Co-Director UW Biorobotics Laboratory Graduate Program in Neuroscience UW CoMotion Presidential Innovation Fellow Research Thrust Testbed Co-Leader

Prof. Chizeck

Howard Jay Chizeck ScD
Professor, Electrical Engineering
Adjunct Professor, Bioengineering
Co-Director UW Biorobotics Laboratory
Graduate Program in Neuroscience
UW CoMotion Presidential Innovation Fellow
Research Thrust Testbed Co-Leader

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Essential Tremor is treated using Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in some patients. Current clinical practice involves Deep Brain Stimulation with an “always on” stimulation. This causes extra battery drain, because stimulation is applied when not needed. Also excessive stimulation is not necessarily a good thing,

Our work is aimed at adjusting the stimulation, so that it comes on and turns off only when needed to suppress tremor symptoms.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Can Be Effective For Severe Tourette Syndrome

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Alon Y. Mogilner, M.D., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Anesthesiology Director, Center for Neuromodulation Department of Neurosurgery NYU Langone Medical Center New York, NY 10016

Alon Mogilner

Alon Y. Mogilner, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Anesthesiology
Director, Center for Neuromodulation
Department of Neurosurgery
NYU Langone Medical Center
New York, NY 10016

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The study was a review of our series of patients with Tourette’s syndrome who had failed all other treatments and who underwent deep brain stimulation (DBS), and the study demonstrated that the procedure was safe and effective in relieving their tics.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response:  Deep brain stimulation can be an effective treatment in patients with severe Tourette’s syndrome.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Further studies should be done to confirm which patients are most likely to benefit.

Disclosure: I have received consulting fees from Medtronic, the company who makes the implants.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Richard S. Dowd, Michael Pourfar, Alon Y. Mogilner. Deep brain stimulation for Tourette syndrome: a single-center series. Journal of Neurosurgery, 2017; 1 DOI: 10.3171/2016.10.JNS161573

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