Could Sucking the Pacifier Clean Lower Your Baby’s Allergy Antibodies?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Eliane Abou-Jaoude, MD  Allergy and Immunology Fellow Henry Ford Health System Detroit, MichiganEliane Abou-Jaoude, MD 
Allergy and Immunology Fellow
Henry Ford Health System
Detroit, Michigan

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Early life exposure to diverse types of microbes is necessary for healthy immune development and may impact the risk for developing allergic disorders.

Theoretically the transfer of parental microbes to their offspring during infancy can influence a child’s developing gut microbiome and subsequent immune response patterns.

We wished to investigate whether parental pacifier cleaning methods, reported at 6-months of age, were associated with altered serum IgE trajectory over the first 18 months of life. 

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Routine Mammography Screening Recommendations Do Not Apply To Women With History of Breast Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Lisa A Newman, MD Director of the Breast Oncology Program for the multi-hospital  Henry Ford  Health System

Dr. Newman

Lisa A Newman, MD
Director of the Breast Oncology Program for the multi-hospital
Henry Ford  Health System

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Response: In 2009 the United States Preventive Services Task Force published a guideline recommending that American women at average risk for breast cancer defer undergoing screening mammography until they reach the age of 50 years. Prior to this publication, women were widely-encouraged to initiate annual mammography at age 40 years. Women that have a history of breast cancer are automatically considered to be at increased risk for developing a new breast cancer, and so routine screening mammography guidelines do not apply to them. These women require annual mammography regardless of age, unless they have undergone a bilateral mastectomy.

We utilized data from Michigan Blue Cross/Blue Shield to evaluate patterns of mammography utilization among women age 40-49 years, comparing rates before versus after 2009, when the USPSTF guideline was published. We analyzed women that had a prior history of breast cancer separately from those that had no history of breast cancer, and we excluded women that underwent bilateral mastectomy.

Disturbingly, we found that mammography utilization rates declined among women with a history of breast cancer as well as among those with no history of breast cancer in the post-2009 timeline.

This suggested to us that changes in screening recommendations may have had the unintended consequence of generating confusion and misunderstandings regarding the value of mammography among women that undeniably benefit from this imaging, such as those with a history of breast cancer.  Continue reading