Tennis Elbow: Is the Problem the Joint or the Tendon?

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Michael Hausman, MD Chief, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Mount Sinai Health System; Professor, Orthopaedics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Dr. Michael Hausman

Michael Hausman, MD
Chief, Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery
Mount Sinai Health System
Professor, Orthopaedics
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?


Response
: Lateral epicondylitis has traditionally been thought of as a tendon problem, but tendon pathology has not been well documented. Our study supports our hypothesis that the problem lies within the elbow joint, rather than in the tendon outside the joint.

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Gas Cavity Produces That Sound When You Crack Your Joints

Gregory N. Kawchuk Ph.D. Department of Physical Therapy  Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Gregory N. Kawchuk Ph.D.

Department of Physical Therapy  Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Jerome Fryer, one of our co-authors, had a new idea for why joints crack. So before delving into this, we went to go to the scientific literature to see if there was anything new in this topic area since it was first studied seriously in 1947. To our surprise, nothing had really been changed in this topic since 1971. It was then we realized there was a real opportunity to use some new technology to see inside the joint in a way that has never been done before.  What we saw was that at the same time the sound is produced, a gas cavity appears. We can’t know for certain that this is the cause of the sound, but it is consistent with what was proposed originally in 1947.

Medical Research: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report? Is there damage to the joints from ‘cracking’ them?

Response: No.  We have known for quite some time from other studies that people who do this habitually do not experience premature joint problems.

Citation:

Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

Gregory N. Kawchuk , Jerome Fryer , Jacob L. Jaremko , Hongbo Zeng , Lindsay Rowe, Richard Thompson

Published: April 15, 2015

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.011947

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Gregory N. Kawchuk Ph.D. (2015). Gas Cavity Produces That Sound When You Crack Your Joints 

Osteoporosis Medications Differ in Joint Fracture Reduction, Adverse Effects

Carolyn J. Crandall, MD, MS Professor of Medicine David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles UCLA Medicine/GIM Los Angeles, CA  90024MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Carolyn J. Crandall, MD, MS
Professor of Medicine
David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California,
Los Angeles

 

Medical Research: What are the main findings of the study?
Dr. Crandall:

1.        We found high-strength evidence that several medications decrease fracture risk when used by persons with bone density in the osteoporotic range and/or with pre-existing hip or vertebral fracture.  While many of the medications (alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, ibandronate, denosumab, teriparatide, and raloxifene) reduce vertebral fractures, a reduction in the risk of hip fracture is not demonstrated for all of the medications.  In particular, hip fracture reduction is only demonstrated for alendronate, risedronate, zoledronic acid, and denosumab.  Unfortunately, due to a lack of head-to-head trials, the comparative effectiveness of the medications is unclear.

2.       The adverse effects of the medications vary.  For example, raloxifene is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, whereas denosumab and the bisphosphonate medications have been associated with increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical subtrochanteric femoral fractures.
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