Tall Height Is a Risk Factor For Venous Thromboembolism

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Bengt Zöller, MD, PhD
Associate professor in Internal Medicine
Specialist Physician in Clinical Chemistry
Specialist Physician in Family Medicine
Lund University/ Region Skåne
Center for Primary Health Care Research
University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Previous studies have suggested an association between height and venous thromboembolism but association might be confounded. We therefore permed a Nationwide study including a cohort of siblings -a co sibling analysis to adjust for familial confounders (genetic and shared familial environmental factors).

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Risk of Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism among Pregnant Women

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Hirohito Ichii, M.D, Ph.D, FACS Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery University of California, Irvine, Orange CA 92868

Dr. Hirohito Ichii

Hirohito Ichii, M.D, Ph.D, FACS
Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery
Division of Transplantation,
Department of Surgery
University of California, Irvine,
Orange CA 92868

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a critical complication after surgery. Although pregnancy is known to increase the risk of VTE 4- to 5-fold, there are scarce data on the risk of VTE among pregnant women who are undergoing surgery. In this study using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data, we observed that pregnant women, compared to matched non-pregnant women, experienced 93% higher likelihood of developing VTE. Absolute incidence of VTE among pregnant vs. matched non-pregnant were 0.5% vs. 0.3%.

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Phase 3 Study Finds XARELTO® Superior to Aspirin for Long-Term Prevention of Recurrent Blood Clots in VTE

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Paul Burton, MD, PhD, FACC Vice President, Medical Affairs Janssen

Dr. Paul Burton

Paul Burton, MD, PhD, FACC
Vice President, Medical Affairs
Janssen

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), affects more than 900,000 Americans each year; one-third of these occurrences are fatal. Once a person experiences a VTE, they are at risk of having another occurrence. Guidelines currently recommend anticoagulant therapy with a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOAC), like XARELTO® (rivaroxaban), for three months or longer. Once anticoagulant therapy is stopped, up to 10 percent of people will experience a recurrence during the first year and up to 20 percent within three years. In people who decide to stop anticoagulant therapy, guidelines currently suggest using aspirin for long-term prevention of recurrent VTE rather than no aspirin at all.

The Phase 3 EINSTEIN CHOICE study was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of XARELTO® to aspirin for continued VTE management in people who experienced an initial VTE. The study met its primary endpoint, finding both XARELTO® doses (10 mg or 20 mg once daily) to be superior to aspirin 100 mg once daily in preventing recurrent VTE, with no significant impact on safety. Specifically, XARELTO® 10 mg reduced the risk of recurrent VTE by 74 percent and XARELTO® 20 mg by 66 percent. Rates of major bleeding were comparable and low across all treatment groups.

These results were presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 64th Annual Scientific Session (ACC.17) during a Joint ACC/Journal of American Medical Association Late-Breaking Clinical Trials session and published simultaneously in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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