Mild Hypothermia During Prolonged Surgery May Reduce Complications

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Brett A. Miles, DDS MD FACS Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Co-Chief Division Head and Neck Oncology Fellowship Director Head and Neck Oncologic and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY 10029

Dr. Miles

Brett A. Miles, DDS MD FACS
Associate Professor of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Co-Chief Division Head and Neck Oncology
Fellowship Director
Head and Neck Oncologic and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, NY 10029 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The ideal core temperature for patients undergoing prolonged major head and neck surgery remains unknown. Previous data indicates the low temperatures may increase the risk of developing postoperative complications such as tissue loss, hematomas, or surgical infections.(1) Other studies have indicated that high temperatures may also influence outcomes and lead to increased complications such as bleeding.(2)

This study was a study of 519 patients who underwent major head and neck surgery at the Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York. The study looked at the core temperature of the patients during prolonged surgery for head and neck cancer in order to identify the optimal temperature range for these patients to prevent complications.

The study found that higher intraoperative temperatures were associated with worse outcomes in terms of tissue loss, wound complications, and infection. Our study suggests an optimal temperature range of 35.3C-37.6C. If patients were above or below that range for a significant period of time, their complications increased. Therefore maintaining this temperature range (mild hypothermia) may improve flap outcomes in this population.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: Controlling the patient’s temperature in the optimal range to achieve mild hypothermia during prolonged surgery may decrease the risk of surgical complications.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future research efforts should focus on maintaining core temperature within the temperature range identified by this study, and assessing surgical outcomes to determine if improved outcomes can be achieved by maintaining this optimal temperature zone during complex surgery with long operative times.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: The authors have no disclosures.

  1. Lee L-I, Lin C-C, Chen M-C, Lin C-H, Shyr M-H. Anesthesia Duration and Hypothermia Affect Graft Survival in Vascularized Free Flap Surgery. Tzu Chi Med J. Vol 172005:17-20.
  2. Brown MJ, Curry TB, Hyder JA, et al. Intraoperative Hypothermia and Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Class I/Clean Wounds: A Case-Control Study. J. Am. Coll. Surg. Vol 224: Elsevier; 2017:160-171.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Abstract presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience.

Mild Hypothermia is Associated with Improved Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Microvascular Head and Neck Reconstruction: A Study of 519 Cases.

 

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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