Non-Medical Factors Affect Racial Disparities in Kidney Transplant Wait Lists

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Yue-Harn Ng,
MD
University of New Mexico

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: ​African Americans (AA) have a higher incidence of end-stage renal disease but lower rates of kidney transplantation (KT) compared to whites (WH).  Disparities persist after adjusting for medical factors.  We assessed the relationship of non-medical (eg. cultural, psychosocial, knowledge) factors with kidney transplantation wait-listing (WL) within the context of racial differences.

​In this longitudinal cohort study, we found that African American patients were less likely to be wait-listed compared to White patients.  This difference was influenced by factors including age, comorbidities, socio-economic status, being on dialysis, having a living donor, transplant knowledge and social support.

MedicalResearch.com: What should clinicians and patients take away from your report?

Response: ​The main take home message in this study is that non-medical factors affect racial disparity in kidney transplant wait-listing hence developing interventions that target psychosocial and cultural factors may help promote ​equal access to kidney transplant.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: Future studies should focus on factors that impact early time to wait-listing and devise interventions in this population to ensure timely completion of the evaluation process (e.g. fast-track transplant evaluation).  Alternative means to ensure the timely ​ completion of transplant evaluation in this population, including the use of navigators to facilitate the completion of the evaluation process, should also be considered

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation: Factors Impacting Racial Disparity in Kidney Transplant Wait-Listing Abstract Number: 2770187
Abstract Category: 1702: Transplantation: Clinical and Translational

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

 

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