Pregnant Women Should Have Blood Pressure Screening for Preeclampsia Throughout Pregnancy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Maureen Phipps, USPTS Task Force member Department chair and Chace-Joukowsky professor of obstetrics and gynecology Assistant dean for teaching and research on women's health Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Phipps

Dr. Maureen Phipps, USPTS Task Force member
Department chair and Chace-Joukowsky professor of obstetrics and gynecology
Assistant dean for teaching and research on women’s health
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure after 20 weeks of pregnancy, is one of the most serious health problems affecting pregnant women. After reviewing the evidence, the Task Force found the benefits of screening for preeclampsia outweighed the harms and recommended screening pregnant women for preeclampsia with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The evidence showed mothers and their babies are likely to benefit from screening, as screening leads to treatment that reduces their risk of severe complications, including death.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Pregnant women should be screened for preeclampsia with blood pressure measurements throughout their pregnancy.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: There are several important areas for research that could help clinicians and their patients better understand subtypes of preeclampsia and the risks to a mother and her baby’s health. Once preeclampsia is more clearly defined, screening tools targeting various subtypes and different study populations may be necessary. Additionally, studies are needed to further develop and validate rigorous assessment tools to identify who is at greatest risk for developing preeclampsia.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: In 2014, the Task Force released a final recommendation on using low-dose aspirin to prevent preeclampsia. We still recommend that women who are at high risk for preeclampsia take low-dose aspirin as preventive medication after 12 weeks of pregnancy.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:

Henderson JT, Thompson JH, Burda BU, Cantor A. Preeclampsia ScreeningEvidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force. JAMA. 2017;317(16):1668-1683. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.18315
Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

More Medical Research Interviews on MedicalResearch.com

[wysija_form id=”5″]

No Comments

Post A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.