Elderly At Greater Risk of Falls With Intensive Blood Pressure Control

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Donal J. Sexton, BSc, MD
The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing
Trinity College Dublin
Health Research Board Clinical Research Facility Galway
National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland
Trinity Health Kidney Centre, Tallaght Hospital
Department of Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital, Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland
Dublin, Ireland

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: In this study we used the inclusion criteria for SPRINT to identify those community dwelling elders who would meet criteria for the trial in clinical practice.

Our data are based on a prospective cohort study composed of participants chosen by a national stratified random sampling mechanism. If SPRINT participants were truly representative of the population, then the participants in the standard care arm of the trial should resemble the population to some extent. If this were true then the injurious falls rate might be similar between the two samples also.

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Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction and Spot Sign in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Andrea Morotti, M.D.
Research Fellow in Neurology
Massachusetts General Hospital
Harvard Medical School

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a validated marker of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH) expansion and may identify those subjects more likely to benefit from intensive blood pressure reduction.

We observed that less than 20% of ICH patients received a CTA as part of their diagnostic workup in a large, international randomized clinical trial. The performance of the spot sign in predicting ICH growth was suboptimal compared with what was reported in previous studies. Intensive blood pressure reduction did not improve functional outcome in spot sign positive patients.

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Fixed-Dose Blood Pressure Medications Save Money In The Long Run

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Kalyani B. Sonawane, PhD Assistant Professor/ PhD Program Director Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy College of Public Health and Health Professions University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610

Dr. Sonawane

Kalyani B. Sonawane, PhD
Assistant Professor/ PhD Program Director
Department of Health Services Research, Management and Policy
College of Public Health and Health Professions
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32610

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Almost one-third of Americans have high blood pressure. Of those patients who are prescribed medication to control their blood pressure, about 30 percent have problems with side effects and nearly 50 percent will not have their blood pressure controlled within the first year of taking medication. In such scenarios, physicians have the option to either add a medication, such as fixed-dose combination, to the patient’s regimen or gradually increase a patient’s dose of their current drug to achieve blood pressure control; and gradually decrease the dose of their current drug or switch to a different drug to resolve side effects. Using healthcare claims data, we compared the economic impact of these alternative treatment modification strategies.

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Study Suggests Isolated Systolic Hypertension In Young Adults Should Be Treated To Prevent Damage To Aorta

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Wanpen Vongpatanasin, M.D.</strong> Professor of Medicine Norman & Audrey Kaplan Chair in Hypertension Fredric L. Coe Professorship in Nephrolithiasis and Mineral Metabolism Research Director, Hypertension Section, Cardiology Division, UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75390-8586

Dr. Vongpatanasin

Wanpen Vongpatanasin, M.D.
Professor of Medicine
Norman & Audrey Kaplan Chair in Hypertension
Fredric L. Coe Professorship in Nephrolithiasis and Mineral Metabolism Research
Director, Hypertension Section,
Cardiology Division,
UT Southwestern Medical Center
Dallas, TX 75390-8586

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: It is well know that treatment of isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), a subtype of hypertension with elevated systolic BP 140 or above but normal diastolic BP of < 90 mmHg, improves cardiovascular outcomes in older adults after the sixth decade of life. However, it is controversial if ISH in young adults requires treatment because it was suggested that elevated systolic BP in these individuals are related to high stroke volume, rather than increased aortic stiffness. In earlier case series, ISH in young adults were particularly common in athletes with long arms and legs, suggesting that pulse wave amplification coupled with high stroke volume were responsible for elevated brachial systolic blood pressure but the true central BP was normal. Thus,  isolated systolic hypertension was proposed to be a spurious condition in young adults that can be ignored.

However, previous studies used only indirect technique in assessing aortic structure and function. Furthermore, none of these studies were conducted in the U.S. Population.

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SPRINT Trial: Intensive Blood Pressure Control Reduces Risk of LVH

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Elsayed Z. Soliman MD, MSc, MS, FAHA, FACC Director, Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center (EPICARE) Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Prevention Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Section Wake Forest School of Medicine Medical Center Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157

Dr. Soliman

Elsayed Z. Soliman MD, MSc, MS, FAHA, FACC
Director, Epidemiological Cardiology Research Center (EPICARE)
Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Prevention
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology Section
Wake Forest School of Medicine
Medical Center Blvd, Winston Salem, NC 27157

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: We already know that left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH, which is the most common complication of high blood pressure, is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We also know that successful management of high blood pressure (BP) leads to regression of LVH and improved CVD outcomes in patients with hypertension. However, it is unknown whether intensive BP lowering beyond that recommended would reduce the risk of LVH in patients with hypertension, and whether reducing the risk of LVH explains the reported CVD benefits of intensive BP lowering in this population. Therefore, we examined the differential impact of intensive BP lowering (target systolic BP (SBP).

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Risk Factors for Nonadherence to Antihypertensive Treatment

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Gupta Pankaj

Dr.Gupta

Dr. Gupta Pankaj
Consultant Metabolic Physician/Chemical Pathologist

Dr. Patel Prashanth - Consultant Metabolic Physician/Chemical Pathologis

Dr. Patel

Dr. Patel Prashanth – Consultant Metabolic Physician/Chemical Pathologist

Department of Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology
University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, UK

 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Non-adherence or patients not taking their medications as prescribed is known since the time of Hippocrates. It is the key reason why blood pressure is well controlled in only around 50% of patients with hypertension, despite the availability of good medicines. Non-adherence leads to poorer cardiovascular outcomes and is thought to cost $100 billion to the US health economy. A crucial reason for the lack of progress in improving adherence has been the previous lack of a clinically useful objective measure.

We and others have developed a robust and reliable biochemical screening method to assess for non- adherence to antihypertensive medications in urine or blood using a technique called liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.  We have previously reported a single centre study that demonstrated high rates of non-adherence in patients attending a hypertension clinic.

Since, then we have set up a National Centre for Adherence Testing (NCAT, ncat@uhl-tr.nhs.uk) in the Department of Metabolic Medicine and Chemical Pathology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL) and receive samples from around 25 hypertension clinics across UK. This study analysed data from~1400 patients consisting of samples received in UHL and also from a cohort of patients in the Czech Republic.

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Rotational Shift Work Linked To Increased Risk of Hypertension, Especially in Men

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD Department of Nephrology and Hypertension Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Dr. Sandhya Manohar

Sandhya Manohar, MBBS, Nephrology Fellow
Project mentor: Sandra M. Herrmann, MD
Department of Nephrology and Hypertension
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: In the last few decades advances in the field of industrialization and technology has turned our world into a 24-7 work zone. Many organizations have turned to a shift system to keep up with the demands of the new world. The consequent changes to our circadian rhythm have resulted in dramatic effects to our body’s physiology. Reports have been surfacing of higher rates of diabetes, obesity, and even cancer in this shift work population.

The risk of hypertension though was controversial and so we set out to review this in our meta-analysis.

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Blood Pressure Medications In Elderly Require Personalized Approach

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Rathi Ravindrarajah PhD Division of Health and Social Care Research Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine  Guy’s Campus King’s College London

Dr. Ravindrarajah

Dr. Rathi Ravindrarajah PhD
Division of Health and Social Care Research
Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine
Guy’s Campus
King’s College London

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Clinical trials show that it is beneficial to lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) in adults aged 80 and over, but non-randomized epidemiological studies suggest that lower systolic blood pressure may be associated with a higher risk of mortality.

Our main findings were that there was a terminal decline in systolic blood pressure in the final 2 years of life suggesting that the higher mortality in those with a low SBP shown in non-randomized epidemiological studies might be due to reverse causation.

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Pregnant Women Should Have Blood Pressure Screening for Preeclampsia Throughout Pregnancy

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Maureen Phipps, USPTS Task Force member Department chair and Chace-Joukowsky professor of obstetrics and gynecology Assistant dean for teaching and research on women's health Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Phipps

Dr. Maureen Phipps, USPTS Task Force member
Department chair and Chace-Joukowsky professor of obstetrics and gynecology
Assistant dean for teaching and research on women’s health
Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Preeclampsia, which includes high blood pressure after 20 weeks of pregnancy, is one of the most serious health problems affecting pregnant women. After reviewing the evidence, the Task Force found the benefits of screening for preeclampsia outweighed the harms and recommended screening pregnant women for preeclampsia with blood pressure measurements throughout pregnancy. The evidence showed mothers and their babies are likely to benefit from screening, as screening leads to treatment that reduces their risk of severe complications, including death.

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Blood Pressure Variability May Trigger Stroke, Especially During Sleep

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Shyam Prabhakaran, MD, MS</strong> Department of Neurology Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University Chicago, IL

Dr. Prabhakaran

Shyam Prabhakaran, MD, MS
Department of Neurology
Feinberg School of Medicine
Northwestern University
Chicago, IL

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Wake-up stroke, or stroke onset during sleep, accounts for one-quarter of stroke presentations. Yet, there are few studies exploring mechanisms or triggers of onset during sleep. We explored whether blood pressure variability which is known to have circadian patterns could trigger wake-up stroke. We found that in the first 24 hours after stroke, those with wake-up stroke had greater blood pressure variability than non-wake up stroke patients.

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