Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease In US Tops 30 Million

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Jennifer L. Bragg-Gresham, MS, PhD Assistant Research Scientist Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center Department of Internal Medicine - Nephrology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Dr. Bragg-Gresham

Jennifer L. Bragg-Gresham, MS, PhD
Assistant Research Scientist
Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center
Department of Internal Medicine – Nephrology
University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: While a trend toward stabilization in CKD prevalence had been detected over the past decade, the most recent data from NHANES (2013-2014) suggests this trend may be ending.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Data from 2013-2014 shows that 15.5% of the US population has reduced kidney function, up from 14.1% (2011-2012) and 12.0% (1988-1994). Over the same time period we have witnessed an increase in risk factors for CKD (age and diabetes, in particular). Adjusting for this fact accounted for much, but not all, of the increase in CKD prevalence.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Despite this finding, we should not become complacent in our fight against kidney disease, as the absolute number of individuals with CKD has increased from approximately 19.2 million (1988-2004) to 33.6 million (2013-2014) in our latest estimates. We must continue to improve awareness and detection of early stages of CKD, as well as improve treatment for CKD risk factors.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We must continue to improve awareness and detection of early stages of CKD, as well as improve treatment for CKD risk factors.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: Health surveillance is paramount to the success of all public health initiatives to understand current data and varied aspects of disease, which supports correct allocation of resources.

Disclosures: This poster was supported by the Supporting, Maintaining and Improving the Surveillance System for Chronic Kidney Disease in the U.S., Cooperative Agreement Number, U58 DP006254, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.
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Citation:

Abstract presented at the Spring 2017 National Kidney Foundation Meeting
RISING CKD PREVALENCE IN THE UNITED STATES (1988-2014)

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

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