Stelara Found Effective in Inducing and Maintaining Remission in Crohn’s Disease

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

William J. Sandborn, MD Professor of Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Surgery Chief, Division of Gastroenterology Director, UCSD IBD Center University of California San Diego and UC San Diego Health System

Dr. William Sandborn

William J. Sandborn, MD
Professor of Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Surgery
Chief, Division of Gastroenterology
Director, UCSD IBD Center
University of California San Diego and UC San Diego Health System

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Sandborn: The Phase 3 IM-UNITI study investigated the efficacy and safety of Stelara (ustekinumab) in the treatment of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease as an every 8 or 12 week maintenance therapy.

The study showed a significant proportion of adults with moderate to severe Crohn’s disease who received Stelara maintenance treatment achieved clinical remission.

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Black Patients Five Times More Likely To Present With Advanced Colon Cancer

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Robert Wong, M.D., M.S. Attending Physician, Gastroenterology & Hepatology Director, GI Education & Research Highland Hospital I A member of Alameda Health System Oakland, CA

Dr. Robert Wong

Robert Wong, M.D., M.S.
Attending Physician, Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Director, GI Education & Research
Highland Hospital I A member of Alameda Health System
Oakland, CA

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Wong:  Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Early diagnosis through implementation of effective screening and surveillance programs leads to earlier staged tumor at time of diagnosis, which increases the treatment opportunities and improves overall survival. However, disparities in access to effective screening and surveillance can impair timely diagnosis and lead to advanced disease, limited treatment options and poor outcomes. The current study evaluated race/ethnicity-specific disparities in colorectal cancer epidemiology at a large urban safety net hospital and observed African American patients had significantly more advanced cancer stage at the time of diagnosis. Our study observed that African Americans were over 5 times more likely to have advanced stage 3-4 colon cancer at time of diagnosis compared with non-Hispanic white patients with colon cancer. While these findings are likely multifactorial, it sheds important light on race/ethnicity-specific disparities in colorectal cancer epidemiology and helps target future education and research to improve outcomes.

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Prevalence of Barrett’s Esophagus Decreasing

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Prateek Sharma

Dr. Prateek Sharma

Dr. Prateek Sharma MD
Professor, Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Motility
Kansas University Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Dr. Sharma: Reflux symptoms are a risk factor for Barrett’s esophagus and approximately 10-15% of patients with reflux are diagnosed with Barrett’s esophagus. Barrett’s esophagus is a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma. We evaluated the trends in the prevalence of be in patients with reflux disease over years and found that the prevalence of be was decreasing.

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Acid Suppression Reduces Risk of Esophageal Cancer in Barrett’s Esophagus

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Aaron Thrift

Dr. Aaron Thrift

Aaron Peter Thrift, Ph.D
Assistant Professor
Duncan Cancer Center
Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology Section
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX, US

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? 

Dr. Thrift: Patients with Barrett’s esophagus are at significantly higher risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. Due to the continued rise in incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma attention has turned to chemoprevention as a method to delay or halt the progression of Barrett’s esophagus to neoplasia, including invasive cancer. Acid suppressive medications, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), are commonly used in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), the primary risk factor for Barrett’s esophagus.

We contacted a nested case-control study involving 311 patients with Barrett’s esophagus who developed esophageal adenocarcinoma (cases) and 856 matched controls (patients with Barrett’s esophagus but who did not develop esophageal adenocarcinoma). Compared to never users, we found that Barrett’s esophagus patients taking PPIs and H2RAs had 69% and 45% lower risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma, respectively. The associations were independent of other risk factors for progression, including concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins.
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Probiotics Found Effective in Preventing Clostridium difficile in Hospitalized Adults Receiving Antibiotics

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Nicole Shen New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College

Dr. Nicole Shen

Dr. Nicole Shen
New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Dr. Shen: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a persistent, healthcare associated infection with significant morbidity and mortality that costs the US billions of dollars annually. Prevention is imperative, particularly for patients at high risk for infection – hospitalized adults taking antibiotics. Trials have suggested probiotics may be useful in preventing CDI. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis in this high-risk population, hospitalized adults receiving antibiotics, to evaluate the current evidence for probiotic use for prevention of CDI.

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