GERD Associated With Increased Risk of Malignancy of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH Ochsner Medical Center

Dr. McCoul

Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH
Ochsner Medical Center

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Population-level data suggests a link between gastroesophageal reflux disease and cancer of the throat and sinuses in adults over 65 years of age.  T

he strength of association between reflux and cancer is strongest for anatomic sites closest to the esophagus, where acid and other stomach contents may have the greatest exposure.

Continue reading

Stretta Procedure Improves GERD Symptoms, Reduces Need for PPIs

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Ronnie Fass, MD Professor, School of Medicine Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Ronnie Fass

Dr. Ronnie Fass, MD
Professor, School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: The endoscopic radiofrequency procedure (Stretta) has been used for more than a decade to treat patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Over time, there were several Meta-analyses with variable designs of the Stretta procedure providing conflicting results. Thus, the purpose of the current systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of the Stretta procedure using all currently available controlled and cohort studies.

Continue reading

Non-Surgical Stretta Therapy For Recalcitrant GERD

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Mark Noar Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center Towson, MD

Dr. Mark Noar

Dr. Mark Noar
Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center
Towson, MD 

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: The background for this study was developed out of a need to know whether the Stretta procedure was effective in both the short and long-term in all forms of reflux. This included standard refluxing patients who had never had surgery but also in the subpopulation of patients who had recurring reflux after having had reflux corrective surgery. The question to be answered was whether the Stretta procedure would be less effective, more effective, or just as effective in the patient who had had prior surgery compared to patients who did not have surgery.

The main findings were that independent of whether a patient had had surgery for the correction of reflux or just had standard reflux without prior surgery, the Stretta procedure was equally effective in all patient subgroups both in the short-term and the long-term.

Continue reading

Acid Reflux More Frequent During Naps than Nighttime Sleep

Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine Case Western Reserve University Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center Cleveland, OHMedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center
Cleveland, OH

MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Fass: This is the first study to compare the extent of acid reflux between nighttime sleep and daytime naps in patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of our study show that naps are associated with significantly greater esophageal acid exposure compared to sleep. Acid reflux events were more frequent and their total duration was longer during naps when compared with acid reflux events during nighttime sleep. Additionally, the fraction of time that the subjects were experiencing acid reflux with pH < 4 was significantly higher during naps than nighttime sleep and subjects experienced more symptoms due to acid reflux during their nap than their sleep.

Continue reading

Barrett’s Esophagus, Erosive Esophagitis, GI Symptoms and H. Pylori

Joel H. Rubenstein, MD, MSc, FACG, FASGE Research Scientist, Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical School VA Medical Center 111-D 2215 Fuller Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Joel H. Rubenstein, MD, MSc, FACG, FASGE
Research Scientist, Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research
Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical School
VA Medical Center Ann Arbor, MI 48105
MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study?

Dr. Rubenstein: In a set of case-control studies within the same population, we found that H. pylori was inversely associated with erosive esophagitis, and with Barrett’s esophagus, but we did not find such a relation with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Continue reading

Newly approved device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

Newswise — April 11 2012— Mayo Clinic in Florida will be one of the first health care institutions in the United States to offer a newly approved device to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The condition, also known as acid reflux disease, can lead to serious health problems.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the device and treatment procedure on March 22 for patients with GERD who continue to have chronic reflux symptoms despite taking medication.

Mayo Clinic in Florida expects to offer the new treatment immediately, says C. Daniel Smith, M.D., chair of the Surgery Department at Mayo Clinic in Florida, and an internationally recognized expert on the treatment of GERD.

Dr. Smith is experienced in using the system because Mayo Clinic in Florida was one of only 14 centers nationally that participated in a clinical trial that led to the FDA’s approval of the device.

“Mayo has been a leader in the treatment of esophageal diseases, especially GERD, and we are pleased to be offering this new treatment to our patients immediately,” he says.

GERD is a condition in which liquid, or food, in the stomach flows back up into the esophagus due to the inability of a ring of muscle between the lower esophagus and the top of the stomach to close properly.

If drugs aimed at neutralizing the acid in the stomach fails to prevent GERD, an operation designed to correct the mechanical defect is considered. But between 1.5 million and 2 million patients of those patients could benefit from treatment that is much less complex than current surgical options, Dr. Smith says.

“The new system will offer a long-needed treatment option for a large group of underserved patients,” he says.

The results of the clinical study that led to approval of the device have not yet been published. But “the data presented to the FDA revealed striking results when compared to other GERD treatments that have been investigated over the past 20 years,” Dr. Smith says. “The system offers effective control of GERD with limited side effects and thus far an excellent safety record.”

The implanted device is a ring of tiny magnetic titanium beads that is wrapped around the junction between the stomach and esophagus, serving as a mechanical augmentation of the lower esophageal sphincter (the ring of muscle). The magnetic attraction between the beads is strong enough to keep the sphincter closed to refluxing acid, but weak enough so that food can pass through it into the stomach, Dr. Smith says. The device can be implanted using minimally invasive surgery methods.

Dr. Smith performs about 200 GERD-related surgeries a year and has been involved with many new treatments over the past several decades. “I expect this device to be a game changer for the treatment of GERD in select patients who have failed management with drugs,” says Dr. Smith.

Ken DeVault, M.D., chair of the Department of Internal Medicine at Mayo Clinic in Florida, also participated in these studies. “I have many patients who are searching for something more than medication for their reflux, but have been hesitant to undergo a traditional reflux surgery,” he says. “I think this procedure may well be a very attractive option for that group.”

Mayo Clinic physicians and scientists collaborated with Torax Medical in the development of this technology and Mayo Clinic licensed related technology to the company in exchange for equity. Drs. DeVault and Smith are paid consultants to Torax Medical.