Author Interviews, Cancer Research, Esophageal, Gastrointestinal Disease, JAMA / 21.12.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_39050" align="alignleft" width="184"]Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH Ochsner Medical Center Dr. McCoul[/caption] Dr. Edward D. McCoul, MD, MPH Ochsner Medical Center MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Population-level data suggests a link between gastroesophageal reflux disease and cancer of the throat and sinuses in adults over 65 years of age.  T he strength of association between reflux and cancer is strongest for anatomic sites closest to the esophagus, where acid and other stomach contents may have the greatest exposure.
Author Interviews, Gastrointestinal Disease, Surgical Research / 11.03.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_32846" align="alignleft" width="142"]Dr. Ronnie Fass, MD Professor, School of Medicine Case Western Reserve University Dr. Ronnie Fass[/caption] Dr. Ronnie Fass, MD Professor, School of Medicine Case Western Reserve University MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: The endoscopic radiofrequency procedure (Stretta) has been used for more than a decade to treat patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Over time, there were several Meta-analyses with variable designs of the Stretta procedure providing conflicting results. Thus, the purpose of the current systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of the Stretta procedure using all currently available controlled and cohort studies.
Author Interviews, Gastrointestinal Disease, Surgical Research / 24.01.2017

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: [caption id="attachment_31334" align="alignleft" width="126"]Dr. Mark Noar Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center Towson, MD Dr. Mark Noar[/caption] Dr. Mark Noar Director of The Heartburn and Reflux Study Center Towson, MD  MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: The background for this study was developed out of a need to know whether the Stretta procedure was effective in both the short and long-term in all forms of reflux. This included standard refluxing patients who had never had surgery but also in the subpopulation of patients who had recurring reflux after having had reflux corrective surgery. The question to be answered was whether the Stretta procedure would be less effective, more effective, or just as effective in the patient who had had prior surgery compared to patients who did not have surgery. The main findings were that independent of whether a patient had had surgery for the correction of reflux or just had standard reflux without prior surgery, the Stretta procedure was equally effective in all patient subgroups both in the short-term and the long-term.
Author Interviews, Case Western, Sleep Disorders / 18.06.2014

Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine Case Western Reserve University Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center Cleveland, OHMedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ronnie Fass, M.D., FACG, Professor of Medicine Case Western Reserve University Director, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Head, Esophageal and Swallowing Center, Metro Health Medical Center Cleveland, OH MedicalResearch: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Fass: This is the first study to compare the extent of acid reflux between nighttime sleep and daytime naps in patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease. The results of our study show that naps are associated with significantly greater esophageal acid exposure compared to sleep. Acid reflux events were more frequent and their total duration was longer during naps when compared with acid reflux events during nighttime sleep. Additionally, the fraction of time that the subjects were experiencing acid reflux with pH < 4 was significantly higher during naps than nighttime sleep and subjects experienced more symptoms due to acid reflux during their nap than their sleep.
Case Western, Esophageal, Gastrointestinal Disease, University of Michigan / 11.09.2013

Joel H. Rubenstein, MD, MSc, FACG, FASGE Research Scientist, Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical School VA Medical Center 111-D 2215 Fuller Rd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Joel H. Rubenstein, MD, MSc, FACG, FASGE Research Scientist, Veterans Affairs Center for Clinical Management Research Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical School VA Medical Center Ann Arbor, MI 48105 MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings of the study? Dr. Rubenstein: In a set of case-control studies within the same population, we found that H. pylori was inversely associated with erosive esophagitis, and with Barrett’s esophagus, but we did not find such a relation with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).