Aging, Social Issues / 12.05.2024

 Supporting a family member to age comfortably at home can range from regular check-ins at a parent's place to aiding a partner in daily tasks like bathing and cooking, along with managing medications and giving injections. No matter the extent of your assistance, the following suggestions can enable your loved one to stay at home comfortably for as long as possible.

Create a plan

Balancing immediate needs with future considerations is crucial. Managing day-to-day tasks alongside medical appointments and medication renewals is essential, all while considering potential challenges related to your loved one's health and age. While you can't predict everything, proactive planning allows for better emergency responses. Don't handle it solo; create a support network with family and friends.
  • Identify responsibilities and reach agreement. Inquire about each team member's willingness to aid in the person's care. Even those at a distance can manage tasks like bill payments, medication orders, and arranging medical appointments. Collaborate on a strategy with them.
  • Assess your own capabilities honestly. Determine what tasks you're comfortable handling. If direct caregiving makes you uneasy, such as assisting with bathing, explore if another team member can take over or discuss the possibility of hiring professional help.
  • Document the plan comprehensively. Having a written plan ensures clarity among all team members, including the care recipient, thereby minimizing confusion. Keep in mind that the plan may need adjustments over time; update it accordingly.
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Aging, Author Interviews, Frailty, Infections / 18.11.2023

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Hira Mohyuddin, PGY-2 Psychiatry Residency Training Program The George Washington University MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Frailty has become increasingly significant as the global population grows older, as this syndrome is linked with a higher mortality and morbidity in aging. Causes contributing to frailty are poorly understood, but it seems that the role of inflammation is very likely. While other chronic infections were shown to precipitate and perpetuate inflammation that contributes to the development of frailty, no prior study has previously focused on possible links between Toxoplasma gondii and geriatric frailty. Benefiting from a collaboration with Spanish and Portuguese researchers, we have now tested, for the first time to our knowledge, this possible association. (more…)
Author Interviews, Geriatrics, JAMA / 15.09.2022

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Jing Li, PhD Assistant Professor of Health Economics The Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy and Economics (CHOICE) Institute University of Washington School of Pharmacy MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Dementia and other cognitive impairment are highly prevalent among older adults in the U.S. and globally, and have been linked to deficiencies in decision-making, especially financial decision-making. However, little is known about the extent to which older adults with cognitive impairment manage their own finances and the characteristics of the assets they manage. (more…)
Aging, Author Interviews, Dental Research, Geriatrics, NYU / 23.01.2022

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Bei Wu, PhD Dean's Professor in Global Health Vice Dean for Research Rory Meyers College of Nursing Affiliated Professor, College of Dentistry Co-Director, NYU Aging Incubator New York University New York, NY 10010 MedicalResearch.com:  What is the background for this study?    Response: Social isolation and loneliness are global public health concerns. Social isolation is the lack of social contacts and having few people to have regular interactions; while loneliness is the distressing feeling of being alone or separated. Approximately 24% of community-dwelling older adults aged 65 and above are considered to be socially isolated in the United States, and 43% adults aged over 60 years old report feeling lonely. Increasing evidence suggests that social isolation and loneliness are risk factors for older adults’ health outcomes, such as depression, comorbidities, cognitive impairment and dementia, and premature mortality. However, one key limitation in the literature is that only a few studies have examined the impact of social isolation and loneliness on oral health. (more…)