Cerebral Perfusion Is Perturbed by Preterm Birth and Brain Injury

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Eman S. Mahdi, MD, MBChB
Pediatric Radiology Fellow

Catherine Limperopoulos, PhD Director, Developing Brain Research Laboratory Co-Director of Research, Division of Neonatology Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology Children’s National Health System Washington, DC

Dr. Catherine Limperopoulos

Catherine Limperopoulos, PhD
Director, Developing Brain Research Laboratory
Co-Director of Research, Division of Neonatology
Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology
Children’s National Health System
Washington, DC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings?

Response: Premature birth is a major public health concern in the United States affecting 1 in 10 infants each year. Prematurity-related brain injury is very common and associated with a high prevalence of brain injury and accompanying lifelong neurodevelopmental morbidities.

Early disturbances in systemic and cerebral hemodynamics are thought to mediate prematurity-related brain injury. The extent to which cerebral blood flow (CBF) is disturbed in preterm birth is poorly understood, in large part because of the lack of monitoring techniques that can directly and non-invasively measure cerebral blood flow.

We report for the first time early disturbances in global and regional cerebral blood flow in preterm infants following brain injury on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over the third trimester of ex-uterine life using arterial spin labelling images. In terms of regional differences, we saw a marked decrease in blood flow to the thalamus and the pons, regions known to be metabolically active during this time.

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Fewer Births To Preteen Mothers Means Lower Preterm Birth Rates

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:
Cynthia Ferre MA PhD

Division of Reproductive Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
CDC

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Reductions in births to teens and preterm birth rates are two recent public health successes in the United States. To date, however, we haven’t had data to indicate whether these two declines are associated. So, we used age-specific data on trends in births overall and in preterm births to determine the effects of changes in maternal age on preterm birth.

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Cause and Preventative Treatment of Most Preterm Births Remains Unknown

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Dr. Joseph Leigh Simpson

Dr. Joseph Leigh Simpson

Joseph Leigh Simpson, MD FACOG, FACMG
President at International Federation of Fertility Societies
March of Dimes Foundation
White Plains, NY

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Preterm birth (PTB) is the most common single cause of perinatal and infant mortality, affecting 15 million infants worldwide each year with global rates increasing. A total of 1.1 million infants die each year. Preterm births and their complications are the leading cause of deaths in children under age 5.

The biological basis of preterm birth remains poorly understood, and for that reason, preventive interventions are often empiric and have only limited benefit. Large differences exist in preterm birth rates across high income countries: 5.5 percent in Sweden and at present 9.6 percent in the U.S. The International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO)/March of Dimes Working Group on Preterm Birth Prevention hypothesized that identifying the risk factors underlying these wide variations could lead to interventions that reduce preterm birth in countries having high rates.

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